Workshop: Getting Safe Streets that Work for Everyone

In this workshop, WABA’s Organizing Manager walks through some of the specific ways that we approach making streets safe, comfortable, and accessible. We review our proven strategies for getting attention and action from DC agencies on sidewalk fixes, intersection improvements, traffic calming, and more to improve traffic safety and reduce traffic crashes.

Agenda

  • Basic steps for interacting with DDOT and city agencies—getting the most out of 311 and traffic safety assessments
  • What to ask for—effective changes for more walkable, safe, and low-stress streets
  • Building support—looping in elected officials and civic groups to get things done
  • Tactics, tips and resources for escalating—proven strategies for demonstrating support and how WABA can support getting results

Download the slides here.

Next Steps

Do you have a street safety issue that affects walking, biking or traffic safety that is not getting traction with a DC agency? Do you have an idea for a design change to make a street near you more walkable and bikeable? We would love to hear about it and connect you with people and resources to make it happen. Email garrett.hennigan@waba.org to get started. Learn more about our campaign to build DC’s Low Stress Bicycle Network and get involved at waba.org/network.

Reporting Road and Infrastructure Maintenance Issues

WABA Trail Rangers work to keep DC’s urban trails in great shape, both by fixing issues and reporting them. We’re reporting the issues we notice but we don’t see everything and you can join us.

In DC, city service and maintenance issues are reported through 311, the citywide call center, either by directly calling 311 or reporting through the mobile app available for iPhone and Android by searching “DC 311.” Issues are reported by service category, so the trick is to know what kind of issue you are reporting so that the report goes to the team that can fix the problem.

311 Categories

311 requests are broken down into categories that can be seen in the app. These make it easier to specify the nature of your issue and there are a few categories that will be more helpful than others.

Roadway Marking Maintenance:

  • Damaged Park-Its
  • Broken flexposts
  • Faded or missing lane markings

Once you’ve told the city what kind of issue and where it is, the next page will ask for specific details. All of the Roadway Marking Maintenance examples above can be categorized as a “bicycle line” on the page for additional information:

Potholes have their own category! Be as specific as you can about the location. Cars parked in bike lanes can be reported as a “No Parking Anytime” enforcement concern. Then add the details – what precisely the issue is and any details that will help the crew know what to bring out into the field and where to go. The more information, the better!

One important note

The trick for a prompt response is to report the issue to the folks who can fix it – those with the tools to fill in potholes, paint asphalt, write tickets. Therefore avoid the service type “Bicycle Issues” – these issue reports go directly to the bike planning team at DDOT. It adds extra steps and time for them to forward requests to the appropriate maintenance teams of DDOT.

Reporting Maintenance Issues in DC: A Trail Ranger Skill Share

  IMG_20150916_095058930_HDR (1) As Trail Rangers we wear a lot of hats: we’re cheerleaders, question answerers, coffee hander outers. But we also work to keep DC’s urban trails in tip top shape both by fixing issues and reporting maintenance issues that require more tools than a broom or a trash bag. The storm last week was not kind to infrastructure—the heavy plows, reduced traction and a buried streetscape resulted in a substantial uptick in potholes and worn away lanes. We’re reporting the issues we notice but we don’t see everything, here is how to join us: In DC, city service and maintenance issues are reported through 311, the citywide call center, either by directly calling 311 or reporting through the mobile app available for iPhone and Android by searching “DC 311.” Screen Shot 2016-02-01 at 1.19.03 PM Issues are reported by service category: Screen Shot 2016-02-01 at 1.31.10 PM So the trick is to know what kind of issue you are reporting so that the report goes to the team that can fix the problem. For this storm, common issues are:

Roadway Marking Maintenance

Great for reporting:
Damaged Park-It

Damaged Park-Its

Broken flexpost

Broken flexposts

Faded/missing lane marking

Faded/missing lane markings

Once you’ve told the city what kind of issue and where it is, the next page will ask for specific details. All of the Roadway Marking Maintenance examples pictured above can be categorized as a “bicycle line” on the page for additional information:

Example report


Potholes:

IMG_20160129_101248294 (1)

Pothole on Champlain Rd NW

Aptly named, a whole category just for potholes! Be as specific as you can about the location.

Cars parked in bike lanes:

For the folks who have “forgotten” with the snow cover that bike lanes are not for vehicle storage. 
car parked in bike lane

Painted lines and bike symbols are just SOOO confusing. What’s a driver to do?

Illegally parked vehicles can be reported as a “No Parking Anytime” enforcement concern. Then add the details – what precisely the issue is and any details that will help the crew know what to bring out into the field and where to go. The more information, the better!  

One important note:

The trick for a prompt response is to report the issue to the folks who can fix it – those with the tools to fill in potholes, paint asphalt, write tickets. Therefore avoid the service type “Bicycle Issues” – these issue reports go directly to the bike planning team at DDOT. It adds extra steps and time for them to forward requests to the appropriate maintenance teams of DDOT. Happy 311-ing!