Upcoming Public Meetings for Bike Lanes in Fairfax County

Buffered bike lanes in Seattle, WA. Source: NACTO

On the heels of its recently passed Bike Master Plan, Fairfax County Department of Transportation is holding two public meetings for bike lane projects. The two meetings are your chance to give input and express support for these projects.

Amherst Avenue/Backlick Road Buffered Bike Lanes
Fairfax County DOT is proposing a lane diet on Amherst Avenue from Cumberland Avenue to Highland Street. A road diet would create space for a buffered bike lane for 1/2 mile. On Backlick Road, public space is constrained. The County is proposing either bike lanes or a neighborhood street route alternative. Attending the public meeting is an opportunity to support full bike lanes on Backlick Road. See the area on Google Maps here.

Meeting Details
February 10th, 2015, 7:00 pm
Lynbrook Elementary School, Cafeteria
5801 Backlick Road
Springfield, VA 22150.

Kingstowne Village Parkway Bike Lanes
The County is proposing a road diet with bike lanes on Kingstown Village Parkway from Beulah Street to Hayfield Street. See the area on Google Maps here.

Meeting Details
February 18th, 2015, 7:00 PM
Kingstowne’s Thomas Center
6090 Kingstowne Village Parkway
Alexandria, VA 22315.

 

Next Big Thing: The Arlington Boulevard Trail

Arlington Blvd Trail in Context

Some context for this exciting new project.

Arlington Boulevard runs just over twelve miles from the National Mall in Washington, DC to Fairfax City, VA, crossing several jurisdictional lines and the Potomac River along the way. The thoroughfare connects more than 100,000 people living in adjacent neighborhoods to offices, retail, parks, schools, and government services. What it lacks is a consistent, high-quality bicycling route. We came up with an analysis of what it would take to solve this problem.

As you can see in the map above, much of an Arlington Boulevard bicycle route already exists. On-road paths and wide service roads with little traffic run parallel to many sections of the road, but they don’t connect to each other. 1.3 miles of bridges and 8.1 miles of protected bicycle lanes (or on-road shared-use paths) would create a continuous trail, 22 miles in length, on both the north and south sides of Arlington Boulevard. Investing in linking this piecemeal infrastructure into a continuous trail corridor—and linking that corridor, in turn, to the regional trail network, would unlock the full potential of the corridor as a place for people, not just automobiles.

We put together a details analysis of the current infrastructure and recommendations for connecting and improving the network.  You can explore the full document here:

Arlington Boulevard Trail Concept Plan

We also have a limited number of paper copies of this document. If you’d like a copy, please send us an email.