Women & Bicycles – Planning Your Route Webinar

Whether it’s the warmer weather and the desire to explore new places or going back to work and the need to adopt new travel habits, you might be wondering how to get from point A to point B. Join us on Saturday, June 12th at 12:00PM for an encore of the previously hosted Women & Bicycles Planning Your Route webinar where we’ll show you resources for how to plan your route.

We acknowledge that a “safe” route means different things for different people and is often connected to one’s race/ethnicity, gender, and other identities. That’s why we’ll be focusing on how to get from place to place by offering a variety of resources that filter for common concerns such as elevation, duration, and type of path. And while we won’t have time to give specific route recommendations for everyone, we do invite people to come with general questions and tips about how to get around and plan your route. Click the registration button to register for this free Zoom event and share it with your friends!

Register 

If you’re unable to join us for the event, here are the Google Slides from the presentation that you can review on your own time.

Note – This event is a part of WABA’s Women & Bicycles program and is only open to those who identify as woman/trans/femme. If that’s not you, we have plenty of other events you should check out at waba.org/fun. Know someone who should come? Please share this event with them! There will be English captioning. If you need accommodations or have questions about access or the event, send us an email at patricia.miguel@waba.org

Women & Bicycles – Planning Your Route Webinar

Whether it’s the warmer weather and the desire to explore new places or going back to work and the need to adopt new travel habits, you might be wondering how to get from point A to point B. Join us on Tuesday, April 20th at 6:00PM for a webinar where we’ll show you resources for how to plan your route.

We acknowledge that a “safe” route means different things for different people and is often connected to one’s race/ethnicity, gender, and other identities. That’s why we’ll be focusing on how to get from place to place by offering a variety of resources that filter for common concerns such as elevation, duration, and type of path. And while we won’t have time to give specific route recommendations for everyone, we do invite people to come with general questions and tips about how to get around and plan your route. Click the registration button to register for this free Zoom event and share it with your friends!

Register 

Note – This event is a part of WABA’s Women & Bicycles program and is only open to those who identify as woman/trans/femme. If that’s not you, we have plenty of other events you should check out at waba.org/fun. Know someone who should come? Please share this event with them! There will be English captioning. If you need accommodations or have questions about access or the event, send us an email at patricia.miguel@waba.org

Prince George’s is hiring a bike and pedestrian coordinator

Cross posted at Greater Greater Washington

Prince George’s County leads the Washington region in pedestrian deaths, and it’s behind when it comes to trails and streets that are safe and useful for people on foot and bike. To fix the problem, the county will soon hire a bicycle and pedestrian coordinator and develop a bikeway plan.

3406567851_02b8c34c49_z

Photo by Cindy Shebley on Flickr.

News of the hire comes from Darrell B. Mobley, Director of the County’s Department of Public Works and Transportation (DPW&T). Mobley says his agency wants to facilitate bicycling. More specifically, Mobley wants to make the county’s bike network more usable. While Prince George’s has a lot of trails and local streets that are perfect for bicycling, they aren’t connected well enough for bicyclists to reach a destination without riding on more hazardous state and county roads. Mobley wants to create a bicycle network across the county using trails, bike lanes and safe streets. The Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) and several county council members have urged DPW&T to hire a bicycle and pedestrian coordinator since Rushern Baker first became the county executive. The county posted the job this week, specifying that it’s a Planner III position that will pay between $53,000 and $97,000 per year. The coordinator will report to Victor Weissberg, the special assistant in the director’s office who has long been responsible for representing the department on bike and pedestrian matters. According to Weissberg, the coordinator will have frequent access to both Mobley and Andre Issayans, DPW&T’s Deputy Director. Developing a bikeway plan is likely to be one of the first tasks for the new hire, says Weissberg. The county’s master plan of transportation shows where bike lanes and trails should be built in the very long run, but it does not address what will actually done or when. Weissberg says that creating a bikeway plan would probably require supplemental funding. “When the county is ready, we will find the money,” says Greg Billing, director of advocacy for WABA. Weissberg is not sure whether DPW&T will create a formal bicycle plan or something more like an internal work plan. But he promises to share drafts with the bicycle community and others as the plan is formulated. Does the new hire signal a substantive change in county policy, or just an institutional commitment? When Mobley was a top official at the Maryland Department of Transportation, the State Highway Administration (SHA) issued a policy declaring that bicycles would be presumed to ride on all state highways where bicycles are not explicitly prohibited, and that SHA would make at least some effort to make bicyling safer. For example, roads might get signs that told drivers that bicycles may take up the full lane. By contrast, DPW&T has stated that some roads are not part of the bicycle network, that cyclists use these roads at their own risk, and that no “use full lane” signs would go up on such roads because doing so would encourage other cyclists to ride on them. Mobley says that he is not ready to endorse SHA’s approach. He says that it is too soon to say that bicycles are part of the expected traffic mix on all county roads because he has not examined all of these roads. He wants to wait for the bike and pedestrian coordinator to come on board so that the county can adopt a position based on a reasoned analysis. “Give us some time and we’ll work through these challenges,” says Mobley.