Antiracism Resources

Antiracism Resources

At WABA, we know that our transportation system is still deadly and unjust, and climate change is already wreaking havoc across the world. Communities of color suffer a disproportionate burden from both these crises. What this means is that we cannot remain passive about racial injustice. It’s not enough to feel like we’re not personally racist, and let Black and Brown people do the work of dismantling racism. To avoid perpetuating injustice with the change we seek to create, we must be actively anti-racist

We have a lot of work to do.

Staff Discussion Group:

One of the ways our staff is working on being anti-racist is through a weekly article discussion group. This space was created for WABA staff in March 2018, and it is a cherished time for staff to come together and discuss a piece of material (book, article, zine, etc.) of their choosing. 

These conversations are safe spaces for our staff, so we are unable to share specific takeaways or lessons learned with the public. We do, however, want to share the list of materials that we are reading. We welcome you to join us in reading these materials at your convenience. 

Don’t Talk about Implicit Bias Without Talking about Structural Racism

The neuroscience behind implicit or unconscious bias, and the context of structural racism that gave rise to and perpetuates inequities and harmful racial biases

 

30 years after ADA, inaccessibility persists for the disabled

A video looking at the history of the Americans with Disability Act and how much work remains, especially in communities of color.

 

12 Things to Do Instead of Calling the Cops

A zine that examines the impulse to call the police in different situations and offers alternatives to engaging law enforcement.

 

How to Promote Racial Equity in the Workplace

Robert Livingston, Harvard Business Review: How to successfully develop policies and practices that promote racial equity in the workplace.

 

Is It Time To Say R.I.P. To ‘POC’?

NPR Code Switch: A deeper look at how academics, writers and the show’s listeners feel about the phrase “people of color.”