Spring Adult Classes: Register now!

Winter may not be over just yet, but our  spring 2020 bicycle education classes are posted and registration is now open! Check out our schedule and find an upcoming class or community ride in a neighborhood near you!

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WABA’s bicycle education classes help you to build confidence! Whether you’re a seasoned bicyclist or are learning to ride  for the first time, our experienced instructors will provide the tips, tricks, and guidance you need to bike with ease.  Did we mention that our classes are FREE for WABA members? Check out all the benefits of membership at waba.org/extras and become a member today!

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Choosing the Class That is Right for You

Adult Learn to Ride – This 3 hour class is for adults who have never ridden a bike before or have not been on a bike in some time. Participants learn the basics of balancing, gliding, and pedaling, with the goal of riding by the end of class! 

Class Details: 

  • Bicycles and helmets provided
  • Subsidized registrations available 
  • Advanced registration required

Basic Skills Clinic – This 2 hour clinic is for participants who have recently taken an Adult Learn to Ride class and would like to continue practicing basic skills. Instructors will teach basic bike handling drills drills such as starting and stopping, turning, weaving and gradual braking.

Class Details: 

  • Bicycles and helmets provided!
  • Bring your own bike and helmet for a reduced registration cost
  • Advanced registration required

City Cycling – This 3 hour class is for participants who know how to ride a bike but would like to build confidence. Participants run through basic bike handling skills to hazard avoidance maneuvers and discuss strategies for riding in different road, bike lane and trail situations. The class ends with a group ride where participants put their newly acquired skills into practice.

Class Details: 

  • Participants must bring their own bicycle and helmet!
  • Use a Capital Bikeshare bike and WABA will reimburse your usage fee!
  • Advanced registration recommended, drop ins are free!

Community Rides – WABA’s community rides are an inclusive space for riders of all levels to explore the region. Community rides are designed to accommodate different distances and interests. 

Class Details: 

  • Family friendly 
  • Participants must bring their own bicycle and helmet
  • Use a Capital Bikeshare bike and WABA will reimburse your usage fee!

Advanced registration recommended, drop ins are free!

Still not sure which class is right for you? Email us at education@waba.org or call 202-518-0524 ext. 221. We’ll help you get signed up for a class in no time. 

Classes Offered with Spanish Translation

This season, select classes across the region will be taught in English and Spanish! Check out our bilingual classes below:

Our highly-trained instructors will provide bilingual instruction to make sure you have the best experience possible. Have any questions? Email education@waba.org.

Now that spring class registration is open, what are you waiting for? Make 2020 the year you accomplish your biking goals. Sign up for a class today!  We can’t wait to see you out there. 

WABA is proud to partner with the District of Columbia, Montgomery County, Arlington County and The City of Alexandria to provide bicycle education classes near you!

Adult Learn to Ride

Register Cost Location

Overview

Our Adult Learn to Ride class is for participants 18 and older who have never ridden a bike before or have not been on a bike in some time. Our experienced Instructors break the skills down step by step to get you on a bike and rolling in no time. Participants learn to start and stop, balance, glide, pedal and steer a bike and progress at their own pace. Have any questions? Email us at education@waba.org

Click here to view WABA’s Code of Conduct for event participants.

Class Details

Class Duration: 3 hours

Equipment: Bicycle and helmet provided

Cost: $85.00 – Non-Resident Registration / $10.00 – Resident Registration* / FREE for WABA members (email education@waba.org for a coupon code)

*WABA partners with local jurisdictions to bring subsidized bicycle education to residents of that jurisdiction.

Registration Policy: Advance registration is required for Adult Learn to Ride classes. Registration closes at 1:00 pm the Friday before class.

Location

Quincy Street Parking Deck
4099 15th St N
Arlington, VA 22207

The class will take place on the top floor of the parking deck near the tennis courts. WABA Instructors will be wearing teal polo shirts.

Driving/Parking
Parking is available at this location. Please enter the parking deck using the eastern entrance, closest to the corner of 15th St. N and Quincy St. Please park along the wall of the parking deck, not in the middle.

Metro
The nearest Metro stop is the Ballston stop on the Orange line. From the stop, walk north on Stafford St. until you reach 15th St. N, then turn right. The parking deck will be on your right, please walk to the entrance closest to Quincy St.

Biking
From the Custis Trail: Follow the trail until you reach the access point on Quincy St. Cross Quincy at the intersection with 15th St. The parking deck entrance will be immediately on your left.

The nearest Capital Bikeshare station is five blocks south on Quincy St. at the Arlington Central Library.

Register

Confident City Cycling

Register Cost Location

Overview

Confident City Cycling teaches you the skills you need to ride safely and confidently on streets, bike lanes and trails alike.

This class is broken into two groups to accommodate different skill levels and interests. The Fundamentals track focuses on practicing basic bike handling skills such as shifting, scanning, signaling, gradual braking and weaving. Instructors discuss the importance of trail etiquette while riding on a multi-use path and answer any questions participants may have about trail riding for commuting or recreation.

The Confidence track teaches hazard avoidance maneuvers necessary while riding on the street and in heavily-trafficked areas. Participants learn skills such as the avoidance weave, quick stop, rock dodge, and instant turn, and discuss considerations for sharing space with other road users.

Each track ends the class with an on-street or on-trail group ride, where participants put their newly acquired skills to the test. Have any questions? Email us at education@waba.org

Class Details

Class Duration: 3 hours

Equipment: Participants are required to bring their own bicycle and helmet for this class. Bikes must be in good working order. Use a Capital Bikeshare bike and WABA will reimburse your usage fee for the duration of the class! Email education@waba.org for more details.

Cost: $10.00 and FREE for WABA members! Contact education@waba.org for a coupon code!

Registration Policy: Advance registration is preferred to secure your spot. Drop-ins are free (if space is available)! Be sure to show up for class 15 minutes before the start time. 

This class is brought to you thanks to the generous support of BikeArlington.

Class Location

Quincy Street Parking Deck
4099 15th St N
Arlington, VA 22207

The class will take place on the top floor of the parking deck near the tennis courts. WABA Instructors will be wearing teal polo shirts.

Driving/Parking
Parking is available at this location. Please enter the parking deck using the eastern entrance, closest to the corner of 15th St. N and Quincy St. Please park along the wall of the parking deck, not in the middle.

Metro
The nearest Metro stop is the Ballston stop on the Orange line. From the stop, walk north on Stafford St. until you reach 15th St. N, then turn right. The parking deck will be on your right, please walk to the entrance closest to Quincy St.

Biking
From the Custis Trail: Follow the trail until you reach the access point on Quincy St. Cross Quincy at the intersection with 15th St. The parking deck entrance will be immediately on your left.

The nearest Capital Bikeshare station is five blocks south on Quincy St. at the Arlington Central Library.

Register

A chance to finish the North Quincy St protected bike lane

Some choices are hard. This one shouldn’t be.

at right, a youth rides her bike in an unprotected bike lane, she rides in a protected bike lane.

This summer, Arlington’s transportation department is repaving half a mile of North Quincy Street which means an opportunity to finally link the Custis Trail to Ballston with continuous, low-stress, protected bike lanes! Do you have five minutes to help make it happen?

Take the Survey

North Quincy Street is an important bike route from the Custis Trail to the Central Library, Washington Liberty High School, parks, shops, and thousands of homes and offices in Ballston. Last year, protected bike lanes were installed from Glebe Rd to Fairfax Drive. 

But the painted bike lanes between the trail and Fairfax Dr remain. And they are just not enough to make most people who bike feel comfortable. Riding here puts you right next to car traffic and even dumps you into traffic at Washington Blvd. It’s stressful, It’s dangerous, and it shouldn’t be.

The department has three different plans for improving the bike lanes and wants your feedback in a short online survey. Only one option includes continuous protected bike lanes, so it should be an easy choice. Click here to take the survey.

The survey closes on Friday, June 28, so don’t put this off!

Don’t Forget Bikes on A New Columbia Pike

Getting from Columbia Pike to Pentagon City by bike is a roundabout and tricky ordeal. As part of Arlington National Cemetery’s Southern Expansion plan, that trip will become a little more direct, but not much better.

New alignment in white. Road to be demolished in yellow.

The Army is working with Arlington County to reroute and build anew, three quarters of a mile of east Columbia Pike to make room for more burial sites. Their preferred plan would create a new 4 lane road with a 10 foot wide sidewalk for biking and walking on the north side. We know we can do better.

Speak Up

This brand new Columbia Pike will be the only bikeable connection across I-395, so it must be great for people on foot and bike. With the Washington Blvd Trail expected to open this fall, new protected bike lanes coming to Pentagon City, and the Cemetery planning a new southern pedestrian entrance, this corridor will be buzzing with activity. A 10 foot shared sidewalk will create continuous conflicts between people biking and walking. Instead, the new Columbia Pike should include separate spaces for all modes: sidewalks for walking, curb-protected bike lanes for bicycling, and driving lanes for cars and buses. This is not too much to ask for a new road, built from scratch. We only get one shot at getting this right.

Ask for something better

For full details on the plan, visit the Southern Expansion project page.

What’s your #BEaPAL resolution?

The Arlington PAL Ambassador program is looking forward to making Arlington a safer place to get around for all in 2018! That’s why, in January, we’ll be asking the community to share their New Year’s resolutions on how they will be a better PAL (Predictable, Alert, and Lawful road user) while walking, biking or driving in Arlington.   Keep an eye out for more information and outreach event updates in the new year, and if you’d like to participate online, share your resolutions with us:  
    • On Twitter, you can find us @arlingtonpal or just tweet with the hashtag #BEaPAL
 
    • On Instagram or post a picture of how you get around Arlington, and don’t forget to tag it with #BEaPAL.
 
  • Or you can post your resolution on our forum.
And now, here’s a year in review of the amazing work the Arlington PAL Ambassadors did this past year. Enjoy!

A rainy yet spectacular Clarendon Mardi Gras Parade!

The time we made some videos for Annmarie’s PALentines Day!

   

Lots of what we call “trailer-ing” with the PAL bike sign.

My first event as the PAL Coordinator (cry emoji) for Earth Day!

ALL the pizza parties…

Predictable, Alert, Lawful: The Musical!

PAL Popsicle Pop-up, in the heat of summer.

Being a PAL means….

A spooky, safety PALoween on Quincy Street!

Daylight Savings bike light distribution to restaurant employees!

Advocacy with art.

A cold, cold, (but super fun) coffee pop-up!

And finally….the PALiversary party!

Thank you to all of our supporters and volunteers for a wonderful 2017. Join us next year in changing road culture in Arlington!  

Popsicle Pop-up makes for happy Arlington residents

With the temperature rising and the humidity, well…being humid, it was certainly harder to leave the AC and get outside in June.  For their monthly block party, the Arlington PAL Ambassadors decided to provide a little motivation and encouragement to trail users with some delicious frozen treats! The PAL Popsicle Pop-up took place where the Custis Trail meets North Quincy Street near Washington-Lee High School in Ballston.  It was also Father’s’ Day, which meant a lot of families spending time outside with their kids! It was great seeing how happy people were to stumble upon our party, especially with the heat in the high 80’s that day.  Some folks followed our chalk signage on the trail, while some PALs made it a point to stop by while on their Sunday adventure. The bike lanes on Quincy St serve as great connectors to not only the Custis Trail, but to Washington-Lee High School, downtown Ballston and several other Arlington connections, as well.  Quincy has been a central piece of the Bike Friendly Ballston campaign, which we hope to continue improving to enhance safety and comfort getting around town. With more and more people, including families, getting out on the trails in the summer months, it’s never a bad idea to remind cyclists and walkers to be predictable, alert and lawful!  It was a lovely afternoon connecting with friends and neighbors, as well as meeting some new PALs.  Want to become an Arlington PAL Ambassador?  Sign up

Arlington’s PAL Ambassadors put on a show for Bike Month

Sometimes asking people to be more predictable, alert, and lawful (or to be a PAL) for safer streets requires you to stand out and make a lot of noise to get their attention, especially if they’re whizzing by in a car or on a bike.  For the Arlington PAL Ambassador May block party, we decided to go all out with a broadway-inspired theme to make our voices heard! “Predictable, Alert, Lawful – The Musical!” was the name of our crosswalk show, which took place at a busy and confusing intersection in the Clarendon neighborhood.  It first started off with three of us – myself along with volunteers Autumn and Rheal – singing our own rendition of “Let it Go” while performing some light choreography in front of cars waiting for the light to turn green.  Were they confused? Probably. Did they enjoy it? Probably! When volunteers Leeann, Greg and Naomi arrived, we then began dancing across the crosswalk to funky tunes and thanking our fellow pedestrians and considerate drivers for being PALs. One walker even told us about the time that he was almost hit by a car at that very intersection.  Vehicles turning right often fail to yield to pedestrians crossing the crosswalk near the O’Sullivan’s Irish Pub. Our crosswalk musical was a hit with the Arlingtonians that interacted with us, and we had a blast ourselves!  While we’ll never know if people became more predictable, alert, and lawful that day, we know one thing for certain – they’ll almost always remember the PAL Ambassadors every time they approach that crosswalk! Want to become an Arlington PAL Ambassador?  Sign up

Meet a PAL Ambassador: Crash

All of the PAL Ambassadors call you Crash…what kind of name is that?! I once T-boned a police car on my bicycle in the rain. No one was seriously injured. That’s…not really an answer. What are your favorite things about Arlington? What do you like to do? I’ve lived here for about six years and it’s a vibrant community with so much diversity and things going on. As small as it is, each corner has a different feel and culture to it. Ballston, Crystal City, West Columbia Pike, Rosslyn. What makes Arlington really unique though is the “Arlington loop”. The 17-mile interconnected connected trail system for walking, bicycling, rollerblading, stroller-pushing, etc, whatever you want to use it for. I don’t imagine many other areas have such a well used and well maintained trail system.  There are also lots of outdoor events, but one of my favorites is the free outdoor movies. Lots of people come out to them. The Predictable, Alert and Lawful (PAL) message is aimed at everyone in the community: bicyclists, pedestrians and drivers.  Which do you see yourself as? I’m definitely all three. I own a car but I commute to and from work by bicycle. Being in all three roles definitely makes you better at all three. When I’m driving, pedestrians will illegally cross in the crosswalk when I’m going through the intersection! What are they thinking? When I’m bicycling, cars will change lanes or turn without using their turn signal! What are they thinking? When I’m walking, bicycles will pass me with little room to spare without notifying me with an audible signal! What are they thinking? Using each mode makes me understand what I can do better in the others. Describe your involvement as a PAL Ambassador and what you enjoy about volunteering. Not going to lie, I saw something in a bicycle newsletter about a pizza party and I can’t turn down food. That was many years ago and now the advocacy is more interesting than the pizza to me. Being a PAL Ambassador is pretty simple, the most important thing is to practice the PAL principles. The aspect I like the most is seeing people from the community being brought together. Volunteering at a big event like Bike To Work Day is amazing because you see how massive the bicycle community is. Volunteering at smaller events like our block parties is amazing because you get to meet families with young children who genuinely enjoy spending wholesome, quality time together outside. Why do you think the PAL program is important and relevant to the Arlington community? Arlington is a perfect intersection of cars, bicycles, and pedestrians. Commuters going into DC by car go through Arlington. Arlington is dense enough that Arlingtonians can easily walk to restaurants and bars. We have fantastic bicycle infrastructure and services so that most of us can either bicycle the complete distance to where we want to go or use it for some of our journey. These three modes of transportation aren’t separate; cars share the lane with bicycles, bicycles may need to share the sidewalk with pedestrians, and pedestrians cross streets used by cars and bikes. Where there’s a feeling of disconnect between the modes is where problems can happen, and the PAL Ambassadors are out there to remind people to put more thought into their behavior. You can meet Crash and more PAL Ambassadors at our Block Party this Saturday!

Meet Annmarie Hansen, our new PAL Ambassador Coordinator!

 
The PAL Ambassadors had fun with the Burma Shave Signs today.

Annmarie Hansen (far right) and the PAL Ambassador team doing some streetcorner outreach. Photo by Pete Beers.

Hello! My name is Annmarie, and I am so excited to be WABA’s new PAL Ambassador Coordinator! (PAL stands for Predictable, Alert and Lawful).  I was drawn to this job because I have lived most of my life in Arlington and Washington. I’ve been riding here since I was a kid, and I’m passionate about safe cycling all over the area. I feel so fortunate that my job involves being nice to people, and helping them feel safe. On Wednesdays growing up, my father, inventor of the “powerboost”, (which, he said, gave me no excuse to walk my single speed up hills) would pick me up from school and I’d perch myself on the seat of his road bike and he would wheel me home. I rode my first bike as much and as far as I could, and spray painted the purple thing black when I decided I wanted to be a tomboy. When I became a grown-up, I didn’t ride my bike for fun anymore. I had places to go, and people to see. And riding a bike was the best way to do all those things. Riding a metro was okay. the bus was always too slow. And cars, well, it didn’t seems to be all it was cracked up to be. But riding a bike? Now that let me feel truly free. I felt in control of my body and my destiny when I was on a bike, and it was awesome. When I was eighteen, I started riding a pedicab, which, at the time was a fun way to make money while riding a tricycle. It’s an exhausting job however, and after 5 years, I decided I wanted to work in bike advocacy. I did this by volunteering a bit with WABA and then all the time at Gearin Up Bicycles. Pete Beers left me some big shoes to fill, but I’m excited to share my own enthusiasm with Arlington and the WABA community. I hope you’ll join me in making the streets of Arlington safe for everybody. If you want to be a PAL Ambassador, sign up here: arlingtonpals.waba.org.