Ask Alexandria’s Mayor and City Council to direct a three-lane configuration for Seminary Road

The City of Alexandria is at a crossroads: City policies require providing safe accommodations for all road users, particularly for people who walk and bike. The safest option for Seminary Road provides a three-lane configuration with center left turn lanes for drivers, pedestrian refuge islands for people who walk, and bike lanes for people who bike.  The City’s Traffic and Parking Board narrowly recommended maintaining four motor vehicle lanes prioritizing motor vehicles, rather than safety and multi-modal transportation. Send a note supporting a three-lane configuration with bike lanes on Seminary Road to let Alexandria officials know that residents support safe streets for everyone. Ask Alexandria’s Mayor and City Council to direct the T&ES Director to implement a three-lane solution for Seminary Road, to provide safe accommodations for all road users consistent with City plans and policies

The City Council-approved Transportation Master Plan and Complete Streets policy emphasize safety for all users and prioritize multimodal transportation, including walking, biking and use of transit. The city’s Environmental Action Plan prioritizes low-carbon mobility options, specifically, a “…transportation system that puts the health, mobility, and accessibility of ‘people first’… with the following level of precedence: pedestrians, bicyclists, public transportation, shared motor vehicles and private motor vehicles.” In March, 2019 city transportation planners proposed reconfiguring a section of Seminary Road, consistent with these plans and policies, a four-to-three lane reconfiguration. The three-lane configuration would apply an FHWA proven safety measure with features including a center left-turn lane for drivers, buffer space and refuge islands for people who walk or take the bus, and bike lanes for people who bike, all without adding to congestion. This section of roadway has excess capacity: traffic is already constrained to one lane in each direction at entrances to the project area 

That said, on June 24, the City of Alexandria Traffic and Parking Board voted 3 to 2 to maintain four lanes for motor vehicles, as advocated by multiple civic associations, in spite of city staff evaluation of the three-lane option as best meeting project criteria and a 2-to-1 majority of speakers at the hearing requesting a three-lane alternative. A group of residents in the Seminary Road area have appealed the Board’s decision to the Mayor and City Council; they argue that  the three-lane configuration is most consistent with City Transportation, Environmental and Complete Streets policies, was the highest-scoring alternative that best meets project goals and objectives, and is the best option for reducing excessive vehicle speeds. The City Council is expected to make a final decision on September 14. Letters and phone calls from residents will help convince Alexandria elected officials that they should demonstrate their commitment to safety and City plans and policies by directing a three-lane solution for Seminary Road. 

Bike Shop Benefits for WABA Members!

Every day, WABA members directly support a happier, healthier, better connected region. Along with 6,200 of your neighbors, you provide the single largest source of unrestricted revenue for WABA—contributions that are absolutely essential to do the advocacy work that makes our region a better place to live and bike. Thank you. We are proud to have your support, and work every day to make you a proud WABA member.

Last fall, WABA launched our Member Extras program to give you another reason to be a proud card-carrying WABA member. Member Extras are perks for WABA members provided by WABA business members that share your values. 

What’s the new deal?

In addition to discounts at some of your favorite coffee shops, breweries, design companies, and more, we partner with a number of local bike shops. As of January 2019, local bike shops no longer offer WABA members discounts on merchandise at their stores. 

WABA bike shop business members now offer WABA members $15 off a tune-up annually—that’s $15 off a tune-up at any of our participating bike shop member locations every time you renew your membership! 

How do I get one?

Look for the “$15 off a tune-up” coupon in the mail each time you renew your membership. (You can always renew early, and we’ll extend your membership another year.) Take the coupon to any of the participating shops for service. Don’t see your shop on the list? Have them email business@waba.org, or give us a call at 202-518-0524 x 211.

If you’re a long-time WABA member, you may be wondering, why no more year-round discount for WABA members at local shops? We want our shops to stay around and grow with the bicycling community for years to come—read more about our decision to update how WABA supports local bike shops below.

Why this change?

After extensive review of the previous discount program and many interviews with shop owners, we learned that the program was actually hurting our local shops and their bottom line. The 5%-10% discounts WABA members received at local shops were cutting into profit margins and not bringing new foot traffic to shops. At the same time, the discounts didn’t have a direct impact on WABA and our mission.

To create a truly bikeable region, WABA wants to support our local bike shops, promote their incredible service and expertise, and celebrate local businesses.

What does the change mean for local bike shops?

WABA bike shop business members work with us to connect our members, their customers, and employees with local and regional advocacy initiatives and support community rides and events. 

We hope playing our part to support the businesses that support us means that everyone, regardless of age or ability, can experience the joy of biking.

Thank you for growing with us, and continuing to support the shops who support us! 

For any further questions about WABA’s Member Extra program, please email business@waba.org, or give us a call at 202-518-0524 x 211.

Arlington County Commits to Vision Zero

Last week, Arlington’s County Board passed a resolution adopting Vision Zero in Arlington County. Their vote officially sets the county on a path to completely eliminate all traffic fatalities and serious injuries on Arlington’s roads through the coordinated effort of many county agencies. Arlington joins Alexandria, DC, and Montgomery County as the fourth jurisdiction to embrace Vision Zero in the Washington area.

Fundamental to this commitment, the Board recognized that far too many people are killed and injured while traveling from one place to another. In recent years, Arlington has experienced as few as one and as many as six traffic fatalities, already making it one of the safest jurisdictions in the region.

But even one death is an unacceptable loss to the community. And rather than accept that loss as an inevitable cost of getting around, Vision Zero puts harm reduction front and center. Every fatality is preventable, and we should not accept even one.

Arlington traffic fatalities and serious crash injuries 2013-2018 from Arlington County

This commitment is a bold and momentous first step for a safe and more livable Arlington. But now starts the hard work. It is up to county staff to create a plan to actually achieve the goal and by when. Over the next few months, county staff will get to work collecting data, analysing problems, learning from other Vision Zero communities, and asking for input as they seek to understand Arlington’s unique traffic safety challenges and develop a five-year action plan.

The plan will identify a range of actions including changes to the way streets are designed. Community engagement will be a critical element of shaping the plan as will addressing the inequitable spread of traffic violence and safe transportation options in Arlington’s communities. 

We want to thank the Board for their leadership, county staff for the hard work and following through on promises made during the bike plan update, and all the community advocates who have tirelessly insisted over the last four years that Arlington must be a leader in transportation safety.

Read the full resolution yourself here. Review the presentation slides here. And watch the full presentation and County Board discussion here starting at 1:05.

The Montgomery County Planning Board should not re-route the Capital Crescent Trail.

Last month, the Montgomery County Planning Board made a hasty and very bad decision on the permanent design for the Capital Crescent Trail’s crossing of Little Falls Parkway in Bethesda. While perhaps made with good intentions, this decision will create unacceptable daily safety risks for the thousands of people who use the trail. The board has started a new term and has a new member. 

In the letter below, we call on the board to reconsider its decision and to put its park users and people first. Use the form below to sign the letter.

Members of the Montgomery County Planning Board,

On June 13, the Planning Board voted 4-1 to reject the analysis and recommendation of Montgomery Parks staff to implement Alternative A including retention of the road diet already in place, and placement of a speed table forcing cars to slow at the crossing.  We are deeply concerned by the Planning Board’s recent decision to not only reject Alternative A as recommended by Parks but to also disregard all other carefully proposed alternatives. The decision to eliminate the road diet put in place after a cyclist died in 2016 runs directly counter to Montgomery County’s core Vision Zero principles, ignores all objective data regarding this intersection, and will endanger vulnerable trail users on the most popular trail in the region.  The Planning Board should reconsider this decision, retain the road diet and endorse the Alternative A approach that has the Trail cross at-grade with Little Falls Parkway.


Montgomery County’s Vision Zero commitment is grounded in just a few core principles. 

  1. Traffic fatalities are preventable. 
  2. Human life takes priority over moving traffic quickly and all other goals of a road system. 
  3. Human error is inevitable, so the transportation system should be designed to anticipate mistakes and reduce their consequences. 
  4. People are inherently vulnerable and speed is a fundamental predictor of crash survival.

While straightforward in theory, designing intersections and roads that follow these principles often requires different tools and different priorities than have been traditionally used. Relying on old auto-oriented values will not help the county eliminate all traffic fatalities.

The board’s chosen intersection design contradicts every one of these (Vision Zero) principles. Restoring Little Falls Parkway to four lanes prioritizes moving cars quickly over the safety of people on the trail. More travel lanes encourage speeding, especially at off-peak times when the road is empty. And doubling the crossing distance increases a person’s exposure to traffic. If everyone follows the rules precisely, the intersection may work. But everyone makes mistakes.

Unfortunately, diverting the trail to the traffic signal and widening the road makes everyone wait much longer. More waiting will bring more cut-through traffic on Hillandale and encourage an increase in frustration, bad choices, and dangerous behavior. Frustrated drivers may run the light or turn right on red. Trail users may cross the Parkway against the light. When someone makes a mistake or a bad choice, it will be more likely to end in a crash and a severe injury or death under the Board’s chosen design.

Montgomery County and Montgomery Planning have committed to Vision Zero with the goal of eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries in just over 10 years. If we are to achieve this goal, we must be consistent throughout the County. The plan Parks recommended for this intersection is consistent with Vision Zero and putting a road diet here has been proven safe and effective with minimal impact on cars. The decision you made on June 13 is just the opposite, makes human life and safety the lowest of priorities, and will set us back in achieving our goals of protecting Montgomery County residents.

We implore you to reconsider this decision and choose a path forward that puts your park users and their safety, first.

Route 66 returns! Here’s why.

In 2018, we added a third route to the offerings for the 50 States Ride. It was called Route 66, and, at about 35 miles, we created it to provide a good middle ground between the 50 States route (60 miles) and the 13 Colonies route (15 miles).

Route 66 leads you on the eight streets named for states that the original US Route 66 passed through. You’ll ride these states in geographical order, east to west, without riding on any other state streets in the District. There are still hills. You still see a ton of the city. And, it’s still a really fun time!

Sign me up!

Take a look at this year’s draft route for Route 66!

This year, we’re bringing Route 66 back and making it part of the regular lineup of 50 States Ride routes. Why? You loved it!

Nearly a third of all 50 States Ride participants in 2018 chose to ride Route 66, which tells us there was significant demand for a middle-ground route like Route 66. And, we got a ton of great, positive feedback about the route:


“Loved the new Route 66 option. I’ve done 50 states in the past and, for lack of a better way of putting it, it was like a 50 states experience quite so many stupid hills :)”

“I loved the new route — 33 miles is the perfect distance. I feel accomplished, saw parts of the city I don’t usually see, and still had energy to enjoy the after party.”

“Bravo to those who designed The Route 66 course! A job well done!”

“I loved the middle distance option – it made inviting a “new-to-cycling” friend MUCH more enjoyable. 15 would have been too short, 60+ would have been way too long, but 35 was just right.”


This isn’t surprising. The 50 States route has a reputation for being incredibly difficult, and, while the challenge is part of the fun, sometimes you don’t want to go on a ride quite so…intense.

We’re hoping that continuing to provide a number of different route length options at our signature ride events will open them up to bicyclists of various comfort levels and styles of biking, and make our community bigger. And we hope you’re part of it!

Convinced? Register now. We’ll see you there!

Let’s Mingle: WABA Summer Member Mixer

Eager to meet your fellow WABA members? Curious about recent advocacy updates? Looking for a new ride route? Come join us for a WABA Member Mixer on July 25, sponsored by our friends at SHARE NOW!

Current WABA members will get their first round on us but don’t worry—you can join as a member on-site.

Details:

When: Thursday, July 25, 5:30 – 8:30pm

Where: Local 16 (1602 U Street NW)

RSVP!

Advocacy Roundup: Summer 2019 Edition

It’s been a long time since we wrote this round-up and it’s been a very busy 2019. In writing this, I want to give my sincerest thanks to those of you who have taken action, shown up, and fought for safer streets, more trails, and better bicycling. I know that it seems like an uphill climb at times, but the effort put into this year has already shown to be powerful. Between pending legislation, refreshed infrastructure planning (DC, Arlington, and Montgomery County), and organizing momentum—we are on our way to better biking in the region. For everyone.

We can’t wait another year for laws to make our streets safer.

If DC is serious about making streets safer, the DC Council needs to hold a hearing on the four bills presented this spring before July recess. Read more about the four bills presented by DC Councilmembers Cheh, Allen, Grosso and Todd here.

Rendering courtesy of DDOT and NPS.

The Arboretum Bridge and Trail is a once-in-a-lifetime connection

The Arboretum Bridge and Trail will not only connect Wards 5 and 7, but it will bring the Anacostia River Trail one step closer to completion! The bridge will serve a transportation function, connecting residents to jobs, local businesses, and much more. It will also connect the Arboretum to Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, uniting two of DC’s most unique outdoor spaces. You can submit your comments on the project by July 31 here.

Rendering of the rejected road diet for the Capital Crescent Trail crossing of Little Falls Parkway.

Planning Board nixes Little Falls Parkway road diet at Capital Crescent Trail

In a surprising and deeply disappointing decision, the Montgomery County Planning Board voted 4:1 to restore Little Falls Parkway to a four-lane road and detour the Capital Crescent Trail to cross at the traffic signal at Arlington Road. They rejected all three options, including the staff recommended one, which were thoroughly studied over the past 18 months. Removing the road diet contradicts county policy, best practices, staff expertise, and parks data, which showed that the road diet substantially reduced crashes and speeding. Read more about the Board’s decision and our thoughts here.

It’s time for a protected bike lane on Fenton Street

Fenton Street in downtown Silver Spring has almost everything it needs to be the Silver Spring’s main street. It is lined by cafes, shops, entertainment and community spaces kept bustling by the tens of thousands of people who live and work nearby. But step off the curb and it’s chaos—unsafe crossings, aggressive drivers and a car-centric road design. Sign the petition to let Montgomery County leaders know that Fenton needs to change, for the better.

Update: Connecticut Ave NW Protected Bike Lane meeting

At a public meeting on June 25th, the District Department of Transportation (DDOT) announced that protected bike lanes were not in the immediate future for the Connecticut Avenue Streetscape and Deckover Project. This came as a shock, as ANC 1B and 2C passed resolutions in support of the PBLs in this project. Following backlash from residents, 22 hours later, DDOT Director Jeff Marootian announced on Twitter that the protected bike lanes will be reinstated into the Connecticut Avenue NW project plans. Read a full recap of the second public meeting here.

Bike to School Day events at Garfield Elementary win DDOT Trailblazer Award!

On May 8 and May 29, WABA supported Safe Kids DC’s Bike to School Day Events at Garfield Preparatory Academy with Safe Routes to School National Partnership, the Metropolitan Police Department, DDOT, and Safe Kids World Wide. 301 youth riders from grades PreK to 5 rotated through three stations: a helmet fitting station, a bike obstacle safety course, and a bicycle license plate art project. Find pictures from the events and a quick recap here!

DDOT shares plans for Florida Ave NE

On Thursday, June 20, DDOT staff hosted a meeting to share their plans for immediate changes to Florida Ave NE to calm traffic, improve intersection safety, and add protected bike lanes on the corridor. Florida Ave NE has long been a dangerous corridor due to rampant speeding and outdated road design. More than 150 people attended to see the plans, ask questions, and share their stories about their ongoing experience with traffic violence.

DDOT’s plan will remove one or more travel lanes from the Avenue from 2nd St. NE to 14th St. NE, narrow travel lanes, and add dedicated turn lanes at intersections. New protected bike lanes, separated by paint, rubber wheel stops, and a new, more imposing kind of bollard, will run from 3rd St. to 14th NE. Changes are also coming to intersections, with new markings and turn restrictions, and to 6th St. NE, where it will become one way north of K St NE. Review the full plans here. DDOT staff will collect comments over the next month and start work in July. Planning continues for the complete reconstruction of the corridor.

Alexandria prioritizes cars over people on Seminary Road

On Monday, June 24th, the City of Alexandria’s Traffic and Parking Board voted 3 to 2 to prioritize cars over people on Seminary Road. The vote was a surprise given that 46 of 68 speakers spoke about the need for safe accommodations on Seminary Road for pedestrians, bicyclists, and people of all ages and abilities. Despite overwhelming support for slower speeds and more people-focused design, the board voted (with little discussion) to recommend that City Council maintain four lanes for cars on Seminary Road between N. Howard Street and N. Quaker Lane. City Council will make the final decision about Seminary Road after a public hearing on Saturday, September 14th.

Arlington wants to reach 8% of people getting around by bike by 2025

Arlington County confirms vision for inclusive, low-stress biking in master plan

In April, the Arlington County Board adopted a new bicycle element for the Master Transportation Plan to support the growth of biking in the county. After two years of hard work, outreach, stakeholder input, and revision, the new plan sets out a much more ambitious, inclusive and low-stress bicycling vision for Arlington.

Montgomery County adopted a new Bicycle Master Plan

In November 2018, Montgomery County adopted a new Bicycle Master Plan, concluding more than three years of intensive analysis, public engagement, and advocacy. By adopting this plan, the County Council endorsed a dramatic shift in the County’s goals and approach to growing bicycling, committing MoCo to a convenient, inclusive, and low-stress bicycling future!

East Coast Greenways Trails Summit

In April 2019, Advocacy Team members Katie and Jonathan presented at the East Coast Greenways Mid-Atlantic Trails and Greenways Summit in a session titled, “Public Engagement in Ways That Count”. Katie and Jonathan presented their unique approaches to engaging community members in their work. Watch their session presentations here!

2019 Washington Region Vision Zero Summit

The third Vision Zero Summit was March 25 at the Milken Institute of Public Health. This year’s Summit had a new component: a Community Listening Session on Traffic Safety, held the evening prior to the Summit at the Anacostia Playhouse. Find the recap of this year’s Summit here. And browse the hashtag #VZSummitDC on Twitter for a full look at Summit highlights.

Nonprofits Unite to Create Equitable Access for Cycling

In May, REI board of directors  and leadership visited Washington, DC for a tour, where our very own Katie Harris did an amazing job representing WABA and the Capital Trails Coalition! Check out their adventures in this clip from REI.

Trainings, Workshops, and Meetings

Rock Creek Far East 1 Livability Study – Public Workshops

DDOT has hosted two of three public events for the Rock Creek East I Livability Study. WABA staff and supporters have been in attendance to share their perspective on improvements to transportation safety in the area of the study. connections to destinations for all modes. At the first public workshop, DDOT introduced the project, shared data collection, and provided opportunities for participants to share existing concerns. In the second meeting, DDOT introduced the corridors that have been identified as focus areas, but are continuing to gather community input. Interested in attending a Ward 4 Community Meeting? Email jonathan.stafford@waba.org.

Ward 8 Traffic Safety Meetings

WABA holds monthly Ward 8 Traffic Safety Meetings with community members, ANC commissioners, Safe Routes to School National Partnership, Safe Kids DC, DDOT, MPD, Mayor’s Office Representatives, Capitol Bikeshare, private sector companies, and local businesses. The group discusses Ward 8 transportation trouble spots, shares ideas for how to make travelling on foot or bike safer, and advocates for safe walking and biking.

Recently, the group met with DDOT and community members for a High Crash Site Visit on South Capitol Street SW. DDOT data shows South Capitol Street to be one of the most dangerous corridors for pedestrians and bicyclists in Ward 8. The group identified safety issues including high speeds, missing signage, and crossing difficulties (to name a few). Interested in attending a Ward 8 Traffic Safety Meeting? Email hannah.neagle@waba.org.

Are you on your local WABA Action Committee?

All across the region great people are working to fix our streets to make biking safe and popular. They meet each month to share ideas and work together for better places to bike. Whether you’re looking for a fun group, a new cause, or a wonky policy discussion, our Action Committees have it covered.

See what we’re doing in your community and join us for the next meeting.

WABA in the News

The District’s long road to building a half-mile bike lane that leads to the U.S. Capitol – The Washington Post, January 1, 2019

DC Metro to allow bikes on trains during rush hour – Washington Examiner, January 2, 2019

Metro to welcome bicycles on trains at rush hour starting Jan. 7 – WJLA, January 2, 2019

Metro lifts ban against bikes on trains during rush hour – The Washington Post, January 2, 2019

DDOT moves ahead on plans for three new protected bike lanes in Northwest – The DC Line, January 4, 2019

District is ramping up street safety measures for the new year – The Washington Post, January 5, 2019

Riders have started to bring their bikes on Metro during rush hour. So far, so good. – The Washington Post, January 15, 2019

Residents and two museums take different sides at a contentious meeting about a Dupont bike lane – Greater Greater Washington, January 18, 2019

DC wants to make clear to drivers that bike lanes aren’t for parking, idling, or loading – The Washington Post, February 21, 2019

DC Quietly Banned Biking With Headphones This Year – DCist, February 19, 2019

Do bike-share programs worsen travel disparities for the poor? – The Washington Post, March 5, 2019

Five Takeaways From Washington Vision Zero Traffic Safety Summit – WAMU, March 14, 2019

The District’s streets are dangerous, unjust and unsafe, by design – Greater Greater Washington, March 21, 2019

Kid-sized ‘traffic parks’ are D.C.’s new playgrounds with a purpose – WAMU, April 11, 2019

Locals call for enforcement of bicycling rules in DC as city plans to install protected bike lanes – WUSA9, April 17, 2019

Bicycle activist killed on bike in crash with stolen van in the District – The Washington Post, April 19, 2019

Bicyclist fatally struck by vehicle on Florida Avenue – WJLA, April 19, 2019

Driver fatally strikes beloved bike advocate in Northeast, marking first 2019 D.C. cyclist death – Curbed DC, April 19, 2019

Police: Driver of stolen van hit, killed biking advocate in DC – WTOP, April 19, 2019

DC plans to step up enforcement of bike lane regulations – The Washington Post, April 20, 2019

Dave Salovesh, 1965 – 2019 – Washington City Paper, April 20, 2019

Cycle of bike thefts ends with officers on bicycles arresting a suspect – The Washington Post, April 21, 2019

‘It’s Frankly, Personal’: DC’s Cycling Community Ramps Up Activism After Longtime Advocate’s Death – DCist, April 22, 2019

After cyclist is hit by police car turning right on red, police charge cyclist – The Washington Post, April 24, 2019

Cyclist collides with police car, riders debate right on red rule – WUSA9, April 25, 2019

‘Die in’ held to protest death of DC cyclist killed by speeding driver – WUSA9, April 26, 2019

Shifting Gears for Your Commute – Alexandria Living Magazine, April 26, 2019

DC Residents Remember Those Who Died in Traffic Accidents – The Afro-American, May 2, 2019

Why do reporters still unquestioningly quote AAA on speed cameras? – Greater Greater Washington, May 16, 2019

Are D.C.’s parking woes so bad that the situation needs citizen enforcers? – The Washington Post, May 19, 2019

Ghost bike memorial gets hit, destroyed by SUV – WTOP, May 20, 2019

E-Bikes and Scooters Will Be Allowed on Some Montgomery County Trails – WAMU, May 20, 2019

A Bridge Connecting The National Arboretum And Kenilworth Park Is Slated for 2021 – May 22, 2019

Local sector plan gains residents’ input for new options on development – Montgomery County Sentinel, June 6, 2019

A Brief Summary of the State of D.C.’s Scooter Scene, Summer 2019 – Washington City Paper, June 10, 2019

DC councilmember questions the need for bike lanes in his ward – Curbed DC, June 14, 2019

A bridge would connect the Arboretum and Kenilworth Park, but how will it impact the Anacostia River? – Greater Greater Washington, June 19, 2019

Road safety events planned in Ward 8, the D.C. ward with the most 2019 traffic deaths – Curbed DC, June 21, 2019

Thanks for reading!

P.S. Like what we’re doing for better bicycling in the region? Our advocacy work is directly funded by your membership dollars—donate today.

Our first Learn to Ride—¡en español!

Our first Learn to Ride in Spanish. Thank you to Casa Chirilagua and the City of Alexandria for partnering with us!

WABA recently partnered with Casa Chirilagua and the City of Alexandria to offer the first Adult Learn to Ride class in Spanish!

Casa Chirilagua is a community nonprofit in Arlandria, a predominantly Latin/x neighborhood of Alexandria. Their main offerings are for English Language Learners (ELL), with programs including after-school care, leadership development, and other community services. Casa Chirilagua is also near the Four Mile Run Park and Trail, which nearby families use for recreation—including biking!

Usually, WABA’s Adult Education programming is offered during the day on the weekends. WABA and Casa Chirilagua decided to offer this class in the evening to accommodate those who work during the day on weekends.

“We are proud to work with local community organizations to expand our programming and offer classes that meet the needs of different populations,” said Sydney Sotelo, WABA’s Adult Education Coordinator. “Luckily, the weather held out for us on Saturday night and our Instructors were able to run the full class, offering individualized instruction to our participants in Spanish. The class was lively with music and snacks and plenty of folks sitting in the park, enjoying the pre-storm sunshine.”

With determination, properly fitted helmets, and balance bikes, all class attendees  were riding on two pedals by the end of the Learn to Ride!

WABA is committed to practices and programming that ensure diversity, equity, and inclusion throughout our work. Hopefully, this first Learn to Ride in Spanish is one of what could be more in the future.

Interested in our Adult Education programs? Visit waba.org/classes to see our full schedule of classes, skills clinics, and community rides.

Update: Connecticut Avenue NW Protected Bike Lane Meeting

One proposed layout of Connecticut Ave between Dupont Circle and California St NW

Update on this meeting:

DDOT’s second project meeting for the Connecticut Avenue NW Streetscape and Deckover Project turned out to be much more contentious than most expected. Though DDOT presented concepts for protected bike lanes on Connecticut Ave at the previous project meeting, staff revealed that the proposed street design would not include bicycle improvements. Protected bike lanes, they said, could be added at a later time.

This revelation came as a shock because there was enthusiasm at the last public meeting for the protected bike lane concepts. Advisory Neighborhood Commissions 2B and 1C passed resolutions in support of protected bike lanes in this corridor and this project. And most critically, DDOT’s 20th Street protected bike lane project, which will be under construction next year, relies on a Connecticut Ave protected bike lane to safely connect to the bicycle corridors on Q St, R St, and Columbia Rd. In the brief Q&A, the majority of comments were from community members frustrated and baffled by the missing bicycle infrastructure.

DDOT project manager Ali Agahi agreed that the team would take a second look at the protected bike lanes. And the following day, DDOT Director Jeff Marootian announced by tweet that bike lanes would added into this project.

For a more thorough analysis of this frustrating development, read Greater Greater Washington’s post.

The presentation and display boards are now available on the project website. Comments are being accepted at CtAveStreetscape@gmail.com. Please share your thoughts with the team.


For more on this project and to see past meeting materials, see the project page.

Meeting Details:

  • Date: June 25, 2019 (past)
  • Time: 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
  • Location Name: The Dupont Circle Hotel, 1500 New Hampshire Avenue NW

We’re Hiring: Advocacy Director

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) seeks a creative, innovative and effective Advocacy Director to achieve the advocacy goals of the organization outlined in WABA’s 5-Year Strategic Plan. The Advocacy Director will lead a team of four+ staff members and our extensive volunteer grassroots advocacy network. WABA advocacy focuses on expanding the bicycling network and making the streets safer for people.

The Advocacy Director is a high-profile representative of the organization to communities, public officials and the media. As a member of the Senior Management Team, the Advocacy Director works directly with the Board of Directors, the Executive Director, and other key organizational staff to achieve WABA’s goals in line with our commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion. The ideal candidate must believe in empowering and organizing communities, share WABA’s vision for better biking in the region, and enjoy working in a fast-paced environment.

Job Responsibilities

  • Lead, manage and inspire a growing advocacy team, including conducting weekly check-ins, performance reviews, and other managerial and administrative tasks.
  • Set advocacy department’s annual work plan, with input from staff and Board of Directors that is consistent with the organization’s mission and strategic plan.
  • Develop, execute and win transportation infrastructure, policy and legislative campaigns in line with the WABA Strategic Plan.
  • Develop WABA’s networks and relationships with other non-profit organizations, businesses, elected public officials, governmental agencies and community leaders.
  • Monitor and prioritize effective organizational involvement in major projects, public budgets and campaigns that impact bicycling .
  • Serve as the organizational representative to the media on advocacy issues.
  • Contribute to the organization’s fundraising and development efforts to grow advocacy capacity through membership growth, donation solicitation and grant writing.
  • Management of current and future grant funded projects necessary to fulfill grant obligations.

 Qualifications

  • Demonstrated management experience including leading a team, strategic planning, and capacity building.
  • Proven ability to supervise, mentor, motivate and evaluate employees.
  • Experience advocating for change in a complex environment.
  • Knowledge of, and enthusiasm for, Washington regional politics.
  • Experience with 501(c)(3) and 501(c)(4) organizations, PACs and the legal restrictions of each.
  • Must be able to write clearly and persuasively.
  • Highly organized, self-motivated and able to work closely with others.
  • Experience working in diverse communities and on diverse teams of staff and volunteers.
  • Bachelor’s Degree in communication, public policy, urban planning, transportation, political science, or a related field; or equivalent professional experience.
  • Masters or legal degree desired, though not required.

Employment Details

This position is full-time. Expected salary range is $60,000-$65,000. The position is based in the WABA Office in Adams Morgan, Washington, DC. All employees are expected to work some evenings and weekends with comp time in exchange. This position will report to WABA’s Executive Director.

Benefits include health/dental insurance (WABA covers 100% of the premium for full-time staff); flexible work schedule; vacation and sick leave; committed colleagues; fun working environment; optional voluntary accident/disability insurance; WABA’s 403(b) retirement program; indoor bike parking; and surprising amounts of ice cream. 

WABA is committed to providing equal employment opportunity for all persons regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, marital status, arrest record or criminal convictions, political affiliation, sexual orientation or gender identity, disability, sex, or age.

Apply

Send a cover letter and resume as one PDF to jobs@waba.org. Please include “Advocacy Director” in the subject line. No phone calls, please. 

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis; the position will remain posted until filled. Interested candidates are encouraged to apply by or before Wednesday, July 17th, 2019. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

About WABA

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) is working to create a healthy, more livable region by promoting bicycling for fun, fitness, and affordable transportation; advocating for better bicycling conditions and transportation choices for a healthier environment; and educating children, adults, and motorists about safe bicycling.

WABA’s programs, from youth education to grassroots community organizing, engage residents in Prince George’s County, Montgomery County, Alexandria, Arlington County, Fairfax County, and Washington, DC. 6,000 dues-paying members and thousands more generous supporters have helped WABA transform bicycling in the region again and again over its 47 year history.

WABA is building a region where, in 2020, we’ll see three times the number of people riding bikes. And, by 2035, every single person will live within one mile of a dedicated safe place to bike. We envision a region in which biking is joyful, safe, popular, and liberating; supported by the necessary infrastructure, laws, activities, and investments; and where bicycle ridership mirrors the incredible diversity of our communities.