Ward 6 Virtual 20×20 Volunteer Meeting

On June 8th, ANC 6D voted to support protected bike lanes on 4th Street SW and signaled their support for protected bike lanes on 1st Street SE.

Many of you contacted ANC commissioners to let them know how important it is to finish these projects.  Ward 6 still has a number of bike projects in the works that need a push to get them over the finish line this year. 

Join us on Zoom!

We still have projects in Shaw, Navy Yard, Waterfront, Capitol Hill and other parts of the ward that need grassroots energy to push DDOT to implement them ASAP. 

Join us on July 30th to help keep our momentum going in Ward 6, a ward that holds key projects that need implementing to complete our protected bike lane network in Washington, DC. . 

Join us on Zoom!

Ward 1 & 2 Safe Streets Monthly Meeting

Ward 1&2 Safe Streets is a group of neighbors working together for safer streets and protected bike lanes in DC’s Wards 1 and 2. Join us at our next monthly meeting by video or phone, learn about our priorities, and get involved!

Join the meeting on Google Meet by clicking here: meet.google.com/gnq-xmju-rmi

Or call in : (321) 684-4551‬ PIN: ‪158 094 190‬#

Get involved in WABA’s 20×20 campaign to support 20 new miles of connected, protected, and equitable bike lanes in DC. We will talk strategy, fun tactics, and next steps for solidifying support for campaigns in Wards 1 & 2 including protected bike lanes on 17th St. NW, 9th St. NW and lanes in Foggy Bottom.

Come meet community advocates, neighbors, and that person you only know on Twitter, roll up your sleeves, and get started! 

Strong proposals from Mayor Bowser for safer, slower streets

Yesterday morning DC Mayor Muriel Bowser announced several big changes that affect how people get around as the District reopens, and beyond. 

Those changes are:

  1. Lowering the speed limit to 20 miles per hour on all local streets. This is a permanent change, and takes effect on Monday, June 1.
  2. Creating a network of “Slow Streets,” open to people and local traffic, with a 15mph speed limit, and marked with barriers and signs. The District Department of Transportation has been tasked with identifying which streets will be a part of this network. We’ll keep you posted as we learn more. 
  3. Allowing restaurants to expand outdoor seating options by widening sidewalks and closing parking or travel lanes. 

These changes are a big deal. A really big deal. Slower driving means safer streets, period.

Here at WABA we congratulate Mayor Bowser and the District Department of Transportation for taking these important steps toward a safer city. These measures, and more like them, are critical to keeping people safe as the city reopens.

As these changes go into effect, we call on the Mayor and her agency staff to make certain that they are implemented in ways that advance racial and socioeconomic equity, not hinder it. We see two components of this:

On Slow Streets: This program’s top priority must be safe transportation for our most vulnerable neighbors. If the primary outcome of these changes is to create leisure space for the District’s most privileged, least vulnerable residents, we will consider it a failure. Long-standing economic disparities in DC mean that black residents, in addition to being disproportionately impacted by our deadly transportation system, are also disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. Black residents make up 75% of DC’s COVID-19 fatalities. Residents of predominantly black neighborhoods have to travel farther to grocery stores, and fewer than one in five can work from home. The Slow Streets program must create safe transportation connections that serve the District’s most vulnerable communities first. 

On Speed Limits: Unequivocally: WABA does not want more police officers pulling people over. The racially disparate impacts of policing are well documented, and WABA opposes any program whose street safety improvements come at the expense of physical safety for people of color.

This speed limit change can only be successful if it is a precursor to changes to street design, and, in the interim, a program of automated enforcement whose exclusive goal is behavior change, rather than punitive fines or revenue.

More thoughts on Speed Limits:

The distinction between “local” and non-local streets presents a challenge. Many of DC’s most densely populated streets are arterial roads, which also serve as retail and transit hubs. We need slower speeds on these major corridors as well.

All that said, 20 MPH is still a really big deal:

Speed is a contributing factor in more than ⅓ of traffic crashes in DC and it is the single largest determining factor in crash survival and injury. We cannot eliminate fatal crashes without slowing down.

And, while it’s not a complete solution, changing speed limits alone does affect driving speeds. When Seattle lowered the speed limits from 30 to 25 mph on urban streets (without any engineering changes) they saw a 45-65% decline in the worst speeding (40+ mph) and substantial drops in crashes and injuries (link). When Alexandria lowered the speed limit on Seminary Road and Quaker Lane, average 85th percentile speeds dropped between 6-15%.

On Outdoor Cafes:

We hope this new policy brings more folks back to work safely, and see it as a positive step toward a long term shift in the District’s allocation of public space—one that prioritizes the mobility and comfort of people over the movement and storage of private automobiles.

Next Steps

We are still learning the details of this proposal, but stay tuned for ways to get involved in making sure these good ideas come to fruition. In the meantime, take a moment to say thank you to Mayor Bowser (@mayorbowser) and DDOT (@DDOTDC) on your preferred social media platform.

Ward 7 Traffic Safety Meeting

Want to work for safer streets in Ward 7?

This month we’re holding a virtual site visit at Minnesota Ave at Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave to identify traffic safety issues for vulnerable road users. We’ll brainstorm possible engineering, education and enforcement solutions for a variety of timeframes.

Join using Google Meet: https://meet.google.com/zsm-uocn-ijr

Join by Phone: ‪(530)-553-8159‬ PIN: ‪398 351 315‬#

Ward 7 Traffic Safety Meeting

Want to work for safer streets in Ward 7?

This month we’re holding a virtual site visit at East Capitol St NE to identify traffic safety issues for vulnerable road users. We’ll brainstorm possible engineering, education and enforcement solutions for a variety of timeframes.

Join using Google Meet: https://meet.google.com/zsm-uocn-ijr

Join by Phone: ‪(530)-553-8159‬ PIN: ‪398 351 315‬#

Ward 8 Traffic Safety Meeting

Want to work for safer streets in Ward 8?

This month we’re holding a virtual site visit at Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue to identify traffic safety issues for vulnerable road users. We’ll brainstorm possible engineering, education and enforcement solutions for a variety of timeframes.

Join Hangouts Meet: https://meet.google.com/ktr-gkrc-mtu

Join by phone‪: 314-649-9733‬ PIN: ‪421 832 208‬#