Summer Advocacy Roundup

This summer has been hot! Our advocacy team has been busy collaborating with partners on the ground to heat up the region with major victories and we are so excited to share these updates with you!

Check out the updates on key campaigns and projects we have been organizing the last couple of months throughout the region! If you have any questions feel free to reach us at advocacy@waba.org.

Washington, D.C. Advocacy Updates

Transformative Budget Victories 

For the last few months, we marched, testified, and lobbied the D.C. Council to fully fund the Vision Zero Enhancement Omnibus Amendment Act of 2020 in the FY22 budget. 

And due to our collective efforts we won! Included in the FY22 Budget is a legislative act that will use future ATE funds to create a dedicated funding source for the Vision Zero Bill AND future bike and pedestrian projects. This is huge!

The vision zero bill will be a tool for advocates to use to expand the number of bike lanes, bus lanes, sidewalks, and more!

And here are other FY22 budget highlights:

  • Funding for the Connecticut Avenue NW Protected Bike Lane
  • Funding for the 9th Street NW Protected Bike Lane
  • Funding to expand and develop our Trails Network
  • Funding to expand our Trails Ranger Program – which means more people to support with trail maintenance. 

Low Stress Bike Network 

This year, DDOT has been busy expanding or planning the expansion of the number of protected bike lanes in the District. 

The K St. NW, 17th Street NW, and 20th St NW protected bike lanes are substantially complete, and the protected bike lanes on Virginia Ave NW, Tunlaw Rd NW & New Mexico Ave NW, North Carolina Ave, 9th Street NW, and others are in the planning stages. 

Despite our progress, there has been pushback! And the only way we counter the pushback is through organizing! 

We’ve seen over and over that when neighbors get organized, bike lanes get built. That’s why we started a low stress bike network campaign, an advocate-driven attempt to build an entire network, block by block, in every Ward.

If you are interested in joining us, head to waba.org/network, click on Join the Campaign and fill out the form! Let’s complete the whole network! 

Campaign to Keep Beach Drive Open to Pedestrians and Bikers

WABA’s campaign with People’s Alliance For Rock Creek (PARC) to keep Beach Drive Open to Pedestrians and Bikers is at a critical point and we are on the edge of victory. But how did we get here? Check out some of the organizing successes that has helped put us on the cusp of a huge victory:

  • Since April, we have gathered over 6,000 petition signatures, 24 organizations, and passed resolutions from the DC and Montgomery County Council all calling on NPS to make the upper Beach Drive car-free zones permanent, 7 days a week after the pandemic. 

So what’s next? NPS began an Environmental Assessment (EA) of future management of Upper Beach Drive and committed to keep things as is until the end of 2021. 

We are seeking formal comments (due 8/22/21) from supporters, organizations, and elected officials. After the comment period is over, a decision is expected after another 30 day comment period in December. Click here to support the growing movement to keep Beach Drive car-free! 

ANC Vision Zero Caucus

A few months ago WABA started the Vision Zero Caucus to create a space for ANC Commissioners to collaborate on sustainable transportation campaigns, as well as provide support and resources to Commissioners. 

Our Commissioners have been meeting on a bi-monthly basis so far, and they have been able to accomplish a lot! 

Our Commissioners have drafted a “fund vision zero in the FY22 budget” sign-on letter and MoveDC resolutions, as well as held a training on using data for transportation advocacy and best practices for developing traffic safety assessments.

Our ANC Vision Zero Caucus is continuing to grow as well! If you are a Commissioner or know of a Commissioner who is interested in joining our Caucus please email advocacy@waba.org.

Transportation Equity

This year, The DC Transportation Equity Network, led by Greater Greater Washington and a steering committee (of which WABA is a member) has brought underrepresented voices to the table on transportation issues at the intersection of climate change through their micro-grant initiative. 

Through the initiative, we awarded micro-grants (up to $2,500) to the following organizations:

  • DC Families for Safe Streets (DCFSS) is using grant funding to collect (video) stories from families impacted by traffic violence
  • Prime Ability Bikes used grant funding to buy bikes for youth at Dunbar High School, they also held a transportation related conversation with youths at the end of a scheduled bike ride. 
  • The Future Foundation Youth used grant funding to develop a transportation equity comic book. 
  • MLOV (Many Languages One Voice): MLOV hosted two transportation related roundtables with DC residents who are immigrants. One in English, one in Spanish . 
  • HIPS DC used grant funding to host a transportation related roundtable with employees and will hold an additional roundtable with clients who are sex workers at a later date.

Stay tuned for the next round of our micro-grant intativie! We look forward to working with our partners on new projects this year. 

In addition to being a steering committee member of the DC TEN, WABA recently joined the Fair Budget Coalition! 

The Fair Budget Coalition advocates for budget and public policy initiatives that seek to address systemic social, racial and economic inequality in the District of Columbia. They work to accomplish these goals by leveraging the collective power of their member organizations and impacted community members, particularly those from Black and other communities of color.

Through this coalition we hope to develop intersectional campaigns that connect housing, transportation and economic justice. 

Maryland Advocacy Updates

Maryland General Assembly Updates

The 2021 legislative session was a busy one, hampered by COVID restrictions but productive nonetheless. The following are the transportation related bills WABA and other bike advocates from around the State, including BikeMD, followed and worked to pass:

  • HB 118/SB 293 – Vehicle Laws -Injury or Death of Vulnerable Individual Penalties
  • HB 562 – Montgomery County –Speed Limits –Establishment 
  • PEPCO Trail paving funded

To read more detail about these bills and our 2021 Maryland General Assembly advocacy check out our blog post here

University boulevard

For the first time ever, Maryland State Highway Administration is placing on-road bike lanes with physical barriers on a State Highway, MD-193, University Boulevard from Arcola Avenue (near Northwood HS) to Amherst Avenue and the Wheaton downtown business district. The bike lanes will run curbside on both sides of the road, repurposing one driving lane in each direction.

This pilot project, funded by a research grant from the Federal Highway Administration, will run 4-6 months beginning in June and will include data collection on use of the on-road bike lanes, car speeds and pedestrian counts on the narrow University Blvd unbuffered sidewalks.

Please demonstrate your support for these lanes by using them before the pilot is over! Here is a map of the bike lanes!

Prince George’s County advocacy training

WABA and Black Women Bike held a Prince George’s County Advocacy Training in May. 

Are you a Prince George’s County resident and want to learn more about how to advocate for better bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure? Do you ever feel like you want to report a maintenance issue, but are not sure who to contact? Are you curious to learn more about what the county is doing to make it safer for walking and biking? Check out a recording of our advocacy training here.

Virginia Advocacy Updates

2021 General Assembly Organizing

As part of our 2021 VA General Session wrap-up, WABA hosted a virtual town hall for WABA members.

Speakers included Wyatt Gordon, Policy & Campaign Manager for Land Use & Transportation, Virginia Conservation Network; and Brantley Tyndall, President, Virginia Bicycling Federation.

During the Post-VA General Assembly town hall, our speakers reflected on the successes and lessons learned from this past session. We also discussed upcoming policies and initiatives that advocates should be pushing in upcoming general assemblies.

You can view a recording of that town hall here.

ActiveFairfax

Fairfax County is continuing its efforts to prioritize transportation for all with its launch of the ActiveFairfax Transportation Plan

The Active Transportation Plan introduces a framework for advancing active transportation that includes an overarching vision statement, goals, objectives, action items, and evaluation metric. 

A draft of the plan’s Vision, Goals and Objectives will become available after July 30th.

Also a draft framework for Fairfax County’s Safe Streets for All Program will be released after July 30th. The program is designed to address systemic transportation safety issues with a focus on vulnerable road users and equity. 

The framework includes proposed education, policy, planning, programmatic and design strategies that can be implemented in a phased approach.

WABA has been attending stakeholder meetings over the past few months to help draft these plans. If you have any questions please email us.

Capital Trails Coalition Updates

Impact Report

The Capital Trails Coalition, in partnership with a team of experts, has developed a report that quantifies the economic, health, and environmental benefits of completing the region’s 881-mile multi-use trail network. 

So far the impact report has received 38 endorsements from elected officials throughout the region! The Impact Report has also received media coverage in the Washington Post, WTOP, and NBC

In addition, the Capital Trails Coalition developed a resolution in support of the goal to complete the remaining top 40 priority projects identified by the Capital Trails Coalition (CTC) by 2025. On June 22nd, the Prince George’s County Council adopted the CTC Resolution and on July 13th, Montgomery County passed it unanimously!

The CTC has produced some monumental wins in the past few months! You can read more about those wins in their quarterly newsletter. Also, subscribe to their newsletter and keep up to date with all the amazing trail developments throughout the region. 

Vision Zero Summit Recap

This year’s summit was more important than ever! This year’s theme was Transportation Equity in Practice and participants discussed the systems, tools, and processes that need to change to make our transportation network more equitable. 

Like previous year’s summits, this event brought together elected officials, decision-makers, advocates, thought leaders, and the private sector to share best practices, insights and innovations to eliminate deaths and serious injuries on our region’s streets and highways.

To view the speaking sessions for yourself, check out the 2021 Washington Region Vision Zero Summit page, which has recordings of all the sessions.

Families for Safe Streets Updates

WABA has been busy collaborating with our Families for Safe Streets chapters throughout the region. Over the last couple of months the chapters have been working on innovative projects to center the voices of residents most impacted by traffic violence. Check out some of their updates below:

  • Northern Virginia Families for Safe Streets (NoVA FSS), with chapters in Alexandria, Arlington and Fairfax, is identifying locations across Northern Virginia where pedestrians and cyclists have experienced near-miss incidents and other dangers.

This information will be reported anonymously to regional municipalities and other transportation focused organizations to identify locations that would benefit from safety improvements but may have not been determined to be problem areas by traditional crash data sources. If you experienced a near miss in Northern Virginia, fill out the survey here! 

  • DC Families for Safe Streets (DC-FSS) is currently working on an initiative to share stories of those who have been impacted by traffic violence. 

They invite those who have been personally impacted by traffic violence in the greater Washington, DC, region to share their story as a loved one or the survivor of a serious crash. Their goal is to build a collection of stories that tells about the personal impact of traffic crashes. Sharing stories can offer comfort to other victims and loved ones and strengthen the case for life saving changes. Please feel free to email them if you’re interested in participating in the group or would like to share your story.

  • Montgomery County Families for Safe Streets (MoCo FSS) informally launched at the Montgomery County Vision Zero Town Hall on January 21, 2021.

MoCo FSS dual purposes are to 1. provide support and resources to families and friends of crash victims who died or were seriously injured by traffic violence, and 2. advocate for redesign of our roads to make them safe for all transportation modes.

In the past few months, the group, supported formally by WABA, has continued to hold memorials for pedestrian and cyclist crash victims. MoCo FSS is currently planning the group’s first event, tentatively scheduled for Sunday November 21 as part of World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims.

If you are interested in getting involved please email us!

Official Testimonies and Comments Submitted by WABA

Upcoming Events and Actions

  • DC
  • MD
    • MoCo FSS is currently planning the group’s first event, tentatively scheduled for Sunday November 21th as part of World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims. Email us to get involved! 
    • The Corridor Forward Plan will evaluate transit options that could serve communities along the I-270 corridor based on Montgomery County’s three core values: 1) community equity; 2) environmental resilience; and 3) economic health. Please take this brief survey, which will help planners understand your values and prioritize transit options.
    • Virtual Town Hall: Wheaton Pedestrian Safety Town-Hall hosted by the District 18 Delegation (Senator Waldstreicher along with Delegates Carr, Shetty, and Solomon), July 27th, 7:00pm-9:00pm. 
    • Prince George’s County Active Transportation Advisory Group is hosting its next meeting on September 13, 2021. The quarterly meetings are opportunities to discuss general issues impacting bicycle, pedestrian and shared use paths in Prince George’s County.
    • The Maryland Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee is hosting its next meeting on October 22, 2021. 
    • Community input will help reimagine the Silver Spring Downtown area over the next 20 years through the Silver Spring Downtown and Adjacent Communities Plan. To stay up-to-date on the progress of this plan, sign up for their eLetter
  • VA
  • Regional 

WABA Advocacy In the News

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Maryland 2021 Legislative Session Summary

The 2021 legislative session was a busy one, hampered by COVID restrictions but productive nonetheless.  Below are the transportation related bills WABA and other bike advocates from around the State, including BikeMD, followed and worked to pass.  We will renew the fight for the ones that did not pass next January in the 2022 session and also make a concerted effort to significantly increase the level of State funds for all active transportation projects.

Bills Passed

HB 118/SB 293 – Vehicle Laws -Injury or Death of Vulnerable Individual -Penalties text here.  This was the main focus of efforts by the BikeMD advocates and will become effective law on October 1, 2021.  The new Vulnerable Road User law will save lives by encouraging safer driving with stronger penalties for those who hurt or kill pedestrians, bicyclists, motorcyclists, wheelchair users and other vulnerable road users lawfully using or crossing our roads.The law mandates a court appearance by any motor vehicle driver who causes a crash with a vulnerable road user who is killed or seriously injured.  In the past, such drivers usually were issued a traffic citation or ticket.  Now, such drivers must appear in court and face stiffer penalties including higher fines, a driver safety program, community service and license suspension for up to six months.  This will provide greater support to victims and friends of crash victims knowing the driver involved will face a greater penalty.    The law helps fill a gap between traffic citations and higher offenses such as criminally negligent manslaughter by vehicle.

HB 562 – Montgomery County –Speed Limits –Establishmenttext here.  Montgomery County and any local jurisdiction in the County  can now decrease the speed limit on a street down to 15 mph after performing an engineering and traffic study. This seems to include State Highways ( such as Georgia Avenue/MD-97) as long as the change is approved by MD State Highway Administration.  This bill will be effective October 1, 2021.

PEPCO Trail paving fundedmore detail here.  $10 Million was appropriated to Montgomery Parks to pave 7 miles of an existing 13 mile natural surface trail that runs along an electric powerline right of way from South Germantown to Cabin John Regional Park.   The trail goes along a electric powerline right-of-way.

Passed but Vetoed by Governor Hogan

HB 114 – Maryland Transit Administration – Funding and MARC Rails Extension Study – establishes and funds a Purple Line Grant program for businesses along the light rail corridor and funds a study on extending MARC service to West Virginia.  It is likely the veto will be overridden by the legislature in 2022.

Proposed but Not Passed

HB 564 – Montgomery County –Automated Traffic Enforcement – the bill would have allowed Montgomery County to transfer the automated traffic enforcement program (Speed and red light cameras) from the police (MCPD) to the transportation agency (MCDOT), thus placing this program with the agency primarily responsible for Vision Zero and any redesign of the roads.  In addition, removing this program from police responsibility could be an initial step towards removing armed police from traffic enforcement overall and thus reducing friction (often racially motivated) between the police and drivers.  This bill passed the House of Delegates, but failed to get a floor vote in the Senate.

HB 0067 – Maryland Department of Transportation Promises Act – bill would have placed restrictions on public-private partnerships and aimed to hold the Maryland Department of Transportation and Hogan Administration to many of the promises made during highway expansion planning.  The bill would prohibit the Board of Public Works from approving a phase public-private partnership agreement for the I-495 and I-270 Public-Private Partnership Program unless the payment of the toll revenue is transferred to a certain special fund; it also would authorize a public-private partnership agreement for the Program to require a bidder to agree to initiate a community benefit agreement.  This bill did not pass either house.

2021 Vision Zero Recap

On Thursday, June 24th WABA hosted the 5th annual Washington Region Vision Zero Summit virtually. 

Dara Baldwin, MPA Director of National Policy, Center for Disability Rights, Inc. (CDR), Co-chair of the Transportation Equity Caucus delivered the keynote address highlighting the institutional racism around which our transportation systems are structured, (including the Vision Zero framework) and the historic to present day negative impacts the system has on Black and brown people. 

The event featured a number of panels (You can find the full agenda here!) and three plenary sessions. 

In the first plenary session, moderator Jeremiah Lowery, Advocacy Director, WABA, and speakers Priya Sarathy Jones, National Policy Campaigns Director, Fines & Fees Justice Center and Jay Beeber, Executive Director, Safer Streets L.A. took a deep dive into the topic of Fines, Fees, and Automated Traffic Enforcement (ATE). We heard how disproportionately damaging fines and fees can be to individuals with low income. Then we heard about some of the shortcomings and damage caused by automated traffic enforcement. Neither fines and fees nor ATE have shown significant  impact on behavior change, and both negatively impact BIPOC and low income folks. So, we’re left with a tough question: why do we use methods that hurt some people and do not create safer roads? 

In the third plenary session, Traffic out of Law Enforcement, panelists Regan F. Patterson, Ph.D., Transportation Equity Research Fellow, Congressional Black Caucus Foundation; Dara Baldwin, MPA Director of National Policy, Center for Disability Rights, Inc. (CDR), Co-chair of the Transportation Equity Caucus; and Joe Reinhard, Activist, Young People for Progress (YPP) in Montgomery County laid out their visions of what it means for people of color to feel safe walking, biking, and using public transit, in addition to outlining how important it is to think about traffic safety and Vision Zero wholly. In this timely and critical conversation, moderated by WABA Advocacy Director Jeremiah Lowery, panelists discussed the case for taking law enforcement out of traffic, how to decrease reliance upon policing and increase our investments in alternative solutions.

The Closing Plenary capped off the day with a multidisciplinary conversation centered on the idea We’re All In This Together. Jonathan Stafford, WABA’s Culture and Engagement Manager led the conversation, which highlighted the necessity of collaborating across sectors to move Vision Zero forward equitably.

Panelists included At-Large Councilmember Hans Riemer, Montgomery County, Maryland; Kori Johnson, Program Support Manager, Safe Routes Partnership; and Christine Sherman Baker, AICP, Principal Planner/Vision Zero Program Coordinator, Arlington County. Each panelist spoke on the institutional or systemic challenges they’ve had in creating an equitable transportation network but they also touched on the ways we can work across sectors to repair it. To view the speaking sessions for yourself, check out the 2021 Washington Region Vision Zero Summit page, which has recordings of all the sessions.


Thank you to our Planning Committee!

Sonya Breehey, Heather Foote, Les Henderson, Chenille Holloman, Blake Herbold, Kori Johnson, Regan Patterson, Kyle Reeder, Ron Thompson and Leah Walton


Thank you to our sponsors:

Gold Sponsors:









Silver Sponsor:

The 2020 WABA Awards (with cookies)

Every spring, in the before times, we’d host an awards event to to celebrate a few folks that have done amazing work to make our region a better place to bike. Couldn’t do that this year.

Instead, last week, we rode around and gave people cookies. Please join us in this post of appreciation and celebration.

Super Volunteer Award:  Laurie Williams- Black Women Bike

We’re so happy to present the 2020 Super Volunteer Award to Laurie Williams. In her work with Black Women Bike, Laurie has introduced a host of new folks from across the county to the nuts and bolts of bike advocacy, in addition to being a vocal and energetic supporter of the Henson Creek Trail.  We are honored to celebrate all that Laurie does for our community!

Public Leadership Award: Fairfax County Board of Supervisor Lusk and Supervisor Alcorn 

We’re excited to present Fairfax County Supervisors Rodney Lusk and Walter Alcorn with our 2020 Public Leadership Award for their work to make Fairfax County a safer place to walk and bike, and roll. At their urging, the Board of Supervisors required the County Department of Transportation to establish a timeline for implementing its ActiveFairfax Transportation Plan, evaluate its current approach for funding pedestrian improvements, and establish measurable safety goals.

Community Advocate Award: Gregg Adams, DCBAC

We’re pleased to present our 2020 Community Advocate Award to Gregg Adams. Gregg is the At-large Bicycle Advisory Council representative for At-Large Councilmember Anita Bonds. Gregg has been a fierce and vocal advocate for a safer Suitland Parkway, for the Eastern Downtown protected bike lane project, and for safety improvements across Ward 8. You may have seen him at public meetings, or leading rides to highlight infrastructure gaps in Ward 8. 

Trail Champion Award: Liz Thorstensen, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

We’re very happy to present our 2020 Trail Champion Award to Liz Thorstensen. Liz is the Chair of the Capital Trails Coalition, where she has been an invaluable partner in developing  the Capital Trails Coalion’s Impact Report, which provides a detailed, data-driven explanation of all of the ways that completing the regional trail network will be amazing (check it out at capitaltrailscoalition.org/report).

Biking for All Award: Sweeetz Labamba, Seasoned Settlers

We’re pleased to present the 2020 Biking For All award to Sweeetz Labamba and her educational entertainment program Seasoned Settlers. Seasoned Settlers organizes bike rides in Ward 8 neighborhoods, creating inclusive opportunities to learn life skills, explore the outdoors, and learn about trails and bike safety. 

Heart and Soul Award: Kristy Daphnis and Alison Gillespie – Open Streets Montgomery

We are pleased to present the 2020 Heart And Soul Award to Kristy Daphnis and Alison Gillespie, for their work forming Open Streets Montgomery. These two veteran advocates were instrumental in opening space on County streets and park roads for people walking, biking and rolling during the pandemic. If you enjoyed riding or walking on car free street in MoCo in 2020, Open Streets Montgomery probably had a hand in making it happen. 

Vision Zero Award:  Councilmember Monique Anderson-Walker, Prince George’s County 

We’re pleased to present our 2020 Vision Zero Award to Prince George’s County Councilmember Monique Anderson-Walker, for her work to prevent crashes on Indian Head highway and change the driving culture in the County and regionally with her #DrivingItHome initiative. Councilmember Walker has been a consistent voice for safety-focused policy changes in Prince George’s.

Educator of the Year Award: Robyn Short

We are excited to present our 2020 Educator of the Year Award to Robyn Short. 

Robyn is a WABA instructor and is a part of the Black Women Bike leadership team. In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, Robyn continued to find opportunities to share her love of biking and teaching with others. She developed multiple webinars for Black Women Bike and WABA, was interviewed by CNN and WAMU on the 2020 bike boom, and has been an excellent spokesperson for bicycle education and COVID safe riding in our region. She brings so much enthusiasm, confidence and warmth to her role as an instructor and a leader. 

Youth Leadership Award: Alex Clark, Prime Ability Bikes

We’re pleased to present our 2020 Youth Leadership Award to Alex Clark, of Prime Ability Bikes. 

Alex is a high school Health and Physical Education teacher and team sports coach at Dunbar High School in Washington, DC. He is also the creator of Prime Ability, with the mission of building communities and inspiring the lives of young people through fitness. Program participants “train at an elite level for their prospective sport, as well as enhance the way they think, make decisions and plan for their lives.” Alex launched the Prime Ability biking program during the pandemic to provide students with a space to grow physically, mentally, emotionally and professionally. He is passionate about using bicycling as an outlet for fun, character development, and community-building.

Speak up for Active Transportation Infrastructure in Arlington County!

Have you ever wished that Arlington County had better bike and pedestrian infrastructure? Do you ever wish that the trails were better connected? We do too! The good news is that you can speak up for bike/ped projects at the upcoming Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) Budget Hearing on Tuesday, June 29th at 7:00pm. Register to testify here.

The CIP budget covers larger and longer-term projects typically dealing with investments in facilities and infrastructure or capital projects. Some examples include projects such as the construction of trails, public schools, or park improvements. These investments often take years to build and their costs may be distributed over a longer period of time than the shorter-term operating budget. 

So, what are a few things that we will be fighting for? 

  1. Additional funding for the Arlington Boulevard Trail
    • Arlington Boulevard Trail upgraded to current trail standards from Jackson St to Glebe Road
    • An improved trail crossing at Glebe Road
    • A new section of off-road trail from Glebe Road to Thomas St. 
    • Upgrades to the existing north-side sidewalk to trail width from Thomas St to George Mason Drive
    • Upgrades to the existing trail between Rhodes Street Bridge to Ft. Meyer Drive.
  2. $150,000 a year for a Vision Zero Tactical Fund to dedicate money for quick-build safety interventions. 
  3. $5 million per year for a Vision Zero Capital Fund to fix priority safety problems on Arlington’s High Injury Network.
  4. A 2-way protected bike lane on Fairfax Drive connecting the Custis & Bluemont Junction Trails to Clarendon.
  5. Protected bike lanes on Highland Street to bridge the “Clarendon Wall” which inhibits north-south bike connectivity in Clarendon.
  6. $1 million to expand the scope of repaving, redevelopment, stormwater projects, and other major construction projects to include the development of quick build protected bike lane projects.
  7. $300,000 for paint and signage on routes & bike boulevards in the Master Transportation Plan (MTP) Bike Element plan.

Our partners at Sustainable Mobility for Arlington also put together a comprehensive outline of more projects that will help Arlington Build Back Better. Explore their summary here: https://susmo.org/building-back-better-in-arlington/slides/

What are we excited to see already included in the CIP? 

  1. $155,000 is included over three years for the Trail light maintenance program
  2. $691,000 for the Army Navy Country Club Trail 
  3. $7.4 million for Trail Modernization 
  4. $6.5 million for the Boundary Channel Drive Interchange improvement 
  5. $12.3 million for the Army Navy Drive Complete Street project which will add Arlington’s first curb-protected bike lanes to Army Navy Drive.
  6. $12.7 Million for BIKEArlington which includes: 
    • Construction of the Potomac Yard / Four Mile Run Trail Connection 
    • Bluemont Junction Trail Safety Improvements
    • Arlington Boulevard Trail (Court House to Rosslyn) 
    • Concept Development of the Arlington National Cemetery Wall Trail 
    • Trail Safety Improvements (various locations) 
    • Concept development of the Custis Trail Renovation and Expansion
    • Funding for 3 new Capital Bikeshare Stations per year as well as an expansion of the e-bikes program

Do not forget to highlight the projects you are excited about in your testimony too! If you are unable to testify live, you can submit comments online. Online comments may be submitted to countyboard@arlingtonva.us.

Tell the DC Council to Fund Key Priorities in the Vision Zero Bill

This past year, people were killed because we failed to invest in a solution that is currently law. People were killed because we failed to implement a solution that is currently law. That law is the Vision Zero Enhancement Omnibus Amendment Act. And as it stands now, a law that can potentially save lives is not a priority in the Mayor’s budget, therefore the DC Council must show leadership and make it their priority. 

It has been well-documented that the District has seen an increase in speeding during the pandemic, and in 2020 we saw an increase in the number of people who lost their lives to traffic crashes compared to 2019. And these numbers could get worse if we don’t make significant investments in moving forward with funding and implementing the Vision Zero Enhancement Omnibus Amendment Act. 

In this year’s budget the Council can take the step to fund budget items in the Vision Zero Act that only require one-time funding. We specifically would like to highlight sections 3, 4, 5(b), 7(), 7(b), 7(c), 7(d), 7(e). 8, 9, 10, and 12 of the legislation for funding in the FY22 budget. Additionally, the Council should re-purpose $250,000 in the Mayor’s budget for vision zero public outreach and align it with the public outreach requirements of section 7(d) in the Vision Zero Act. 

We want to clearly state that is just part of what needs to be done to fully fund and implement the Vision Zero Act. Until the act is fully implemented, the Council must hold DDOT accountable, by requiring DDOT to be publicly transparent with how they plan to fully implement this act over the next few years. 

Rock Creek Park Trail Construction!

After more than 20 years of advocacy, the Rock Creek Park Trail is finally getting a much needed makeover! The District Department of Transportation just broke ground on the first phase of construction to rebuild and widen 3.7 miles of trail in Rock Creek Park, including a new access trail on Piney Branch Parkway and a new trail bridge south of the tunnel. This project compliments the trail rehabilitation and reconstruction of Beach Drive that finished in 2019.

Decades in the making, the improvements will be worth the wait. DDOT, in partnership with the National Park Service, is completely rebuilding the trail west of the creek. Among the highlights are:

  • A new trail on Piney Branch Parkway – the well-used dirt trail alongside Piney Branch Parkway will be turned into a paved, ADA accessible trail to help neighbors east of the park safely access it. Until very recently, there was no sidewalk or low-stress bicycle connection to Beach Drive between Klingle Road and West Beach Drive at the Maryland Line.
  • A new bike / ped trail bridge – a new 110 ft trail bridge will span the creek immediately south of the Zoo tunnel, a huge improvement from the current narrow sidewalk adjacent to car traffic
  • Reopening the Zoo Tunnel Bypass – For decades, the trail around the tunnel has been slowly falling into the creek. (a 2013 photo)). After a large storm in 2018, three sections of this trail collapsed into the creek, forcing the closure of the tunnel bypass trail. This project will finally rebuild the creek banks and replace the trail. This work is expected to begin in 2021. Unfortunately, this fix will not change the nighttime closure that routes trail users into the tunnel because this trail is still within the National Zoo’s security perimeter and subject to it’s operating hours.
  • Widening & pavement improvement – The existing 8-foot crumbling trail will be rebuilt to modern trail standards with improved foundations and drainage. Most sections will be widened to 10 feet plus a gravel shoulder except at some environmentally sensitive pinch points. 

The National Park Service also recently started construction on repairs and upgrades to the 1.5 miles of trail along the Potomac River including the Rock Creek Trail south of Virginia Ave NW and the West Potomac Park Trail between Ohio Drive and the Tidal Basin inlet bridge. Both will be widened to 8-10 feet, repaved, and re-aligned for a more comfortable ride. The work includes some intersection safety improvements, more green space, and a new trail tunnel through the supports of the Theodore Roosevelt Bridge for more room and comfort! Learn more here.

What to Know About Construction and Detours

Construction started in Spring 2021 and will continue through 2023 in phases. Detours for trail users will be set up and signed.

See the DDOT project page for more information and detailed detour maps for reconstruction north of Virginia Ave. DDOT made a quick video about the changes here. See the NPS project page for detour maps for reconstruction south of Virginia Ave by the Kennedy Center and Ohio Drive.

Bethesda Afternoon Social Ride + Happy Hour

Register Cost Location

Our conversational skills may be rusty and we are still getting used to seeing people’s full faces, but that won’t stop us from enjoying all the of things that we haven’t been able to do in the last year! Join us for our first community ride since 2019 as we wind along the streets and trails of downtown Bethesda. Afterwards, we will stop for snacks and refreshments provided by SILVER restaurant! Alcoholic drinks will not be provided, but you are welcome to purchase them if you wish! Invite your friends, bring your family along or stop by to meet new people! We can’t wait to see you there.

Click here to view WABA’s Code of Conduct for event participants.

Ride Details

Duration: 1.5 hour ride + after ride snacks and refreshments at SILVER restaurant until 8:00 pm

Equipment: Participants are required to bring their own bicycle and helmet for this class. Use a Capital Bikeshare bike or Ebike and WABA will reimburse your usage fee for the duration of the class! Email education@waba.org for more details.

Cost: $10.00 and FREE for WABA members! Contact education@waba.org for a coupon code!

Registration Policy: Advance registration is required for this event. Be sure to show up for the ride at least 10 minutes before departure.

This ride is brought to you thanks to the generous support of Bethesda Transportation Solutions and Montgomery County Commuter Services.

Health and Safety Protocols

Due to the ongoing effects of COVID-19, all participants are expected to adhere to WABA’s health and safety guidelines for in-person events.

  • Participants should not attend in-person events if they feel sick or show symptoms of illness. WABA will refund registration fees to individuals who cannot attend because they are sick on the day of an event. If you are sick and unable to attend an in-person event, contact WABA for a refund.
  • WABA Adult Education classes are mask optional. WABA does not require participants to be vaccinated in order to attend class although we strongly encourage all participants to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Those who have not been vaccinated are required to wear a CDC approved facemask for the duration of class. Anyone who has received the COVID-19 vaccine may choose to forgo masks and social distancing. WABA respects anyone’s decision to wear a mask and encourages all people to advocate for themselves. If you would like to wear a mask during class and would like to maintain social distancing we highly encourage you to do so! WABA will not tolerate any disrespect towards WABA staff or participants who choose to wear a mask for their own safety and peace of mind.
  • Participants will provide their contact information at event registration. Participants consent to WABA contacting them and/or releasing their contact information to necessary authorities if there is a need for contact tracing following an event to contain an outbreak of COVID-19.

Please follow SILVER restaurant’s COVID-19 policies during the after ride happy hour!

Ride Location

Start Point:  Bethesda Metro Station Plaza near the Capital Bikeshare docking station

Bethesda Metro / Wisconsin Ave & Old Georgetown Rd, Bethesda, MD 20814

Instructors will be wearing teal polo shirts.

Driving: There is a parking garage across the street from the Metro station located at 7401 Waverly St, Bethesda, MD 20814

End Point: SILVER Restaurant

7150 Woodmont Ave, Bethesda, MD 20815

Register

Adult Learn to Ride

Register Cost Location

Overview

Our Adult Learn to Ride class is for participants 18 and older who have never ridden a bike before or have not been on a bike in some time. Our experienced Instructors break the skills down step by step to get you on a bike and rolling in no time. Participants learn to start and stop, balance, glide, pedal and steer a bike and progress at their own pace.

Have any questions? Email us at education@waba.org

Click here to view WABA’s Code of Conduct for event participants.

Health and Safety Protocols

Due to the ongoing effects of COVID-19, all participants are expected to adhere to WABA’s health and safety guidelines for in-person events.

  • Participants should not attend in-person events if they feel sick or show symptoms of illness. WABA will refund registration fees to individuals who cannot attend because they are sick on the day of an event. If you are sick and unable to attend an in-person event, contact WABA for a refund.
  • WABA Adult Education classes are mask optional. WABA does not require participants to be vaccinated in order to attend class although we strongly encourage all participants to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Those who have not been vaccinated are required to wear a CDC approved facemask for the duration of class. Anyone who has received the COVID-19 vaccine may choose to forgo masks and social distancing. WABA respects anyone’s decision to wear a mask and encourages all people to advocate for themselves. If you would like to wear a mask during class and would like to maintain social distancing we highly encourage you to do so! WABA will not tolerate any disrespect towards WABA staff or participants who choose to wear a mask for their own safety and peace of mind.
  • Classes will be limited to 10 participants and 3 instructors.
  • Participants will provide their contact information at event registration. Participants consent to WABA contacting them and/or releasing their contact information to necessary authorities if there is a need for contact tracing following an event to contain an outbreak of COVID-19.

Class Details

Class Duration
3 hours

Equipment
Bicycle and helmet rental provided

Cost
FREE
– WABA members and Capital Bikeshare for All (email us for a coupon)
$10.00 – Resident Registration**
$85.00 – Non-Resident Registration

*WABA partners with local jurisdictions to bring subsidized bicycle education to residents of that jurisdiction. Example – if you are a Fairfax County resident taking a class in Fairfax County your registration is just $10.00!

Registration Policy: Advance registration is required for Adult Learn to Ride classes. Registration closes at 1:00 pm the Thursday before class.

This class is brought to you thanks to the generous support of BikeArlington

Location

Quincy Street Parking Deck
4099 15th St N
Arlington, VA 22207

The class will take place on the top floor of the parking deck near the tennis courts. WABA Instructors will be wearing teal polo shirts.

Driving/Parking
Parking is available at this location. Please enter the parking deck using the eastern entrance, closest to the corner of 15th St. N and Quincy St. Please park along the wall of the parking deck, not in the middle.

Metro
The nearest Metro stop is the Ballston stop on the Orange line. From the stop, walk north on Stafford St. until you reach 15th St. N, then turn right. The parking deck will be on your right, please walk to the entrance closest to Quincy St.

Biking
From the Custis Trail: Follow the trail until you reach the access point on Quincy St. Cross Quincy at the intersection with 15th St. The parking deck entrance will be immediately on your left.

The nearest Capital Bikeshare station is five blocks south on Quincy St. at the Arlington Central Library.

Register

Hover over the box and scroll to click the registration button.

Adult Learn to Ride

Register Cost Location

Overview

Our Adult Learn to Ride class is for participants 18 and older who have never ridden a bike before or have not been on a bike in some time. Our experienced Instructors break the skills down step by step to get you on a bike and rolling in no time. Participants learn to start and stop, balance, glide, pedal and steer a bike and progress at their own pace.

Have any questions? Email us at education@waba.org

Click here to view WABA’s Code of Conduct for event participants.

Health and Safety Protocols

Due to the ongoing effects of COVID-19, all participants are expected to adhere to WABA’s health and safety guidelines for in-person events.

  • Participants should not attend in-person events if they feel sick or show symptoms of illness. WABA will refund registration fees to individuals who cannot attend because they are sick on the day of an event. If you are sick and unable to attend an in-person event, contact WABA for a refund.
  • WABA Adult Education classes are mask optional. WABA does not require participants to be vaccinated in order to attend class although we strongly encourage all participants to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Those who have not been vaccinated are required to wear a CDC approved facemask for the duration of class. Anyone who has received the COVID-19 vaccine may choose to forgo masks and social distancing. WABA respects anyone’s decision to wear a mask and encourages all people to advocate for themselves. If you would like to wear a mask during class and would like to maintain social distancing we highly encourage you to do so! WABA will not tolerate any disrespect towards WABA staff or participants who choose to wear a mask for their own safety and peace of mind.
  • Classes will be limited to 10 participants and 3 instructors.
  • Participants will provide their contact information at event registration. Participants consent to WABA contacting them and/or releasing their contact information to necessary authorities if there is a need for contact tracing following an event to contain an outbreak of COVID-19.

Class Details

Class Duration
3 hours

Equipment
Bicycle and helmet rental provided

Cost
FREE
– WABA members and Capital Bikeshare for All (email us for a coupon)
$10.00 – Resident Registration**
$85.00 – Non-Resident Registration

*WABA partners with local jurisdictions to bring subsidized bicycle education to residents of that jurisdiction. Example – if you are a Fairfax County resident taking a class in Fairfax County your registration is just $10.00!

Registration Policy: Advance registration is required for Adult Learn to Ride classes. Registration closes at 1:00 pm the Thursday before class.

This class is brought to you thanks to the generous support of BikeArlington

Location

Quincy Street Parking Deck
4099 15th St N
Arlington, VA 22207

The class will take place on the top floor of the parking deck near the tennis courts. WABA Instructors will be wearing teal polo shirts.

Driving/Parking
Parking is available at this location. Please enter the parking deck using the eastern entrance, closest to the corner of 15th St. N and Quincy St. Please park along the wall of the parking deck, not in the middle.

Metro
The nearest Metro stop is the Ballston stop on the Orange line. From the stop, walk north on Stafford St. until you reach 15th St. N, then turn right. The parking deck will be on your right, please walk to the entrance closest to Quincy St.

Biking
From the Custis Trail: Follow the trail until you reach the access point on Quincy St. Cross Quincy at the intersection with 15th St. The parking deck entrance will be immediately on your left.

The nearest Capital Bikeshare station is five blocks south on Quincy St. at the Arlington Central Library.

Register

Hover over the box and scroll to click the registration button.