Urgent: Fairness for Crash Victims in Virginia

People injured walking and biking in Virginia face an uphill battle to get fairly compensated for damages from a crash resulting from a negligent driver. An antiquated legal doctrine called contributory negligence stacks the deck in favor of insurance companies and against people who are hurt. Crashes can cause damage to a person’s bike and other property, run up expensive medical bills and impact one’s ability to work. Injured people deserve a fighting chance to be fairly compensated for damages.

The Virginia General Assembly is considering legislation that will level the playing field when bicyclists and pedestrians are hurt in crashes by negligent drivers. Yesterday, the Civil Law Subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee voted in support of Senate Bill 659 and tomorrow the full committee will vote on the bill. The legislation is modeled on a similar bill passed in the District of Columbia in 2016 which has shown to be effective, targeted and fair.

People walking and biking in Virginia involved in a crash with the driver of a motor vehicle can be completed barred from receiving any compensation for injuries if they are even slightly at fault. Depending on the severity of a crash, a victim can rack up huge medical bills, lost wages because of missed work, face lasting injuries and other damages to personal property such as a bicycle.

Under the antiquated legal doctrine contributory negligence, powerful insurance companies can deny all claims from a crash victim in unfair and unjust ways. 46 states in the United States have adopted the more fair comparative standard that weighs each parties negligence and adjusts compensation accordingly

Senate Bill 659 is modeled on a similar bill passed in the District of Columbia in 2016 which gives crash victims access to full compensation if they are the less negligent party. The DC law has shown to be effective, targeted and fair. Scare tactics from the insurance industry have not borne out. Virginia’s crash victims deserve better.

Yesterday, the Civil Law Subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee favorable voted in support of Senate Bill 659 and tomorrow the full committee will vote on the bill. The next step in the process would be a vote by the full State Senate if the bill is reported out of the Judiciary Committee.

Editor’s note: please pardon our typos. The Virginia legislative session is extremely short.

Today only: double your impact.

Today, five donors who have supported WABA for more than a decade are stepping up. They’re matching your donation, dollar for dollar, up to $11,000.

DOUBLE YOUR DONATION

Each of these donors has gone above and beyond through the last decade (or more), and today, they want you to join them. Can you make a gift today to help WABA enter the next ten years strong?

We have so much on the horizon for the 2020s. We’ll have multiple car-free bridges. Our trail network will near completion. We’ll have networks of connected, protected bike lanes equitably distributed across the region.

A decade ago, we didn’t have a single protected bike lane in the region. Our trail planners weren’t talking to each other. We didn’t have a robust bikeshare system, and we couldn’t take bikes on Metro during rush hour. 

But our donors had faith and hope, and generously stepped up to help build a region where getting out of your car and on a bike is not just an option, it’s a joy. 

Will you join them today? We are relying on you to build a better connected, more beautiful region. Let’s build something special together.

MATCH YOUR GIFT

Thank you!

Showing up in more places than ever

If you’ve supported WABA in the past—by making a donation, becoming a member, or attending a signature event: thank you!

Your donation means more people showing up for biking when it matters—at meetings, at hearings, at neighborhood events. And when we can count on you, we can make more happen in 2020.

I’m here for more bike lanes

We are so grateful for your past investment in WABA, which was invaluable in building a strong organization capable of driving change in our region. Can we count on you again this December?

Your donation not only supports the community organizing work I wrote about last week, it supports work in communities across the region that means more people riding bikes and more, better places to ride.

In addition to much of the work you already know about and rely on every time you get on your bike, here’s some of what your donation will make possible in 2020:

  • We’re going to help more kids have fun on their bikes. Our youth education program is expanding to Montgomery County! We’ll be teaching children in afterschool programs how to ride safely, and at the end of each six-week session, leading a celebratory family bike ride.
  • We’re going to teach adult education classes in ASL and Spanish as well as English, so we can help more people ride confidently on city streets.
  • We’re going to host more bike rides than ever. We launched two new rides in 2019 (the Sprouts Ride and the Sweet Ride), and in addition to those and our other signature events, we’ll be organizing lots of free rides—about one a week when the weather’s great for biking!

Will you make a donation today to ensure we can organize rides for people of all backgrounds and abilities?

Yes to more bike rides

  • We’ll be showing up in more places than ever, including Union Station! With your support, WABA is working to take over the iconic bike center at Union Station to provide a literal hub for after-work on-bike adventures. 
  • We’re working to expand our beloved Trail Ranger program to Prince George’s County! You might have seen our Trail Rangers out on DC trails, doing trail maintenance and connecting people with helpful resources. Our neighbors in Prince George’s County boast some of the loveliest trails in our region, and your support for the program here has shown the County the value of expansion. 
  • We can’t say too much yet, but we’re going to show what safer streets could look like, and how our communities could connect around shared public space—more color, more space to play, and more neighbors talking to neighbors.
  • WABA spearheads the Capital Trails Coalition, which builds support for and leads the development of the Capital Trails Network. When it’s finished, we’ll enjoy 300 additional miles of connected, world-class trails. To build political support for the network, WABA is helping the Coalition make the business case for trails: we know trails are great, but what will be the true impact on the health, environment, and economics of our region? 
  • Thanks to WABA, five of the six jurisdictions we serve have committed to Vision Zero: the conviction that no person should be seriously injured or killed traveling on our roads. But the pledge is just a start, and our job is to hold government agencies accountable to their commitment and ensure they hear from you. In 2020, we’ll host two Listening Sessions leading up to our Vision Zero Summit so that policy makers hear directly from you and your neighbors about what matters on your streets.

Will you make a donation to WABA today? Your tax-deductible donation means more bike lanes, safer streets, healthier people, and connected communities.

I can help!

We need you to help make this work happen! If you make a donation today, we won’t ask again the rest of the year. And if everyone reading this made a donation, we’d reach our goal AND have the resources to hire another organizer. Can you help?

Making space for joy and humanity

Back in October, something magical happened on Georgia Avenue NW. I hope you were there. For a few hours, tens of thousands of people got to experience the potential of our city’s public space—walking, biking, dancing, gossiping, practicing yoga, learning to ride a unicycle. It’s amazing how much joy and humanity you can fit into three miles of city street when you make space for it.

DC’s first Open Streets event was a resounding success, and it would not have happened at all without you. Thank you. Your investment in WABA is an investment in a more joyful, more human city. You’re investing in the decades of advocacy, relationship building, and activism that it takes to reimagine our city. Will you make a donation today to make our region a better place to live and bike?

donate

A young person in a superhero costume rides a bicycle down a car-free georgia ave NW during DC's first Open Streets event

All of you made so much good happen for bicycling in 2019, and we are so proud of the strides we made together:

  • There’s space for you and your bike on Metro, any time.
  • We’re a big step closer to building Long Bridge, our region’s first bicycle-pedestrian bridge across the Potomac River.
  • We’re making progress towards another new bridge, connecting the Anacostia River Trail to the National Arboretum.
  • We fought hard for and won eight new protected bike lanes in the District—some are short, but they’re all important, and we’re building momentum for 20 miles by the end of next year (more on that later).
  • Seven really important transportation bills are in the DC Council right now. Wins there will mean slower speed limits, safer intersections, and faster fixes to dangerous roads.
  • Downtown Silver Spring has the Mid-Atlantic region’s first Protected Intersection—a low stress bike experience that extends all the way through a busy road crossing.
  • Prince George’s County and Arlington County both acknowledged that “fewer” people dying on its roads isn’t good enough, and that zero is the only morally acceptable goal by committing to Vision Zero.
  • There are bike lanes on Seminary Road in Alexandria!
  • Arlington County finalized its Bicycle Master Plan, which calls for almost 90 miles of new, low-stress bike lanes and trails by 2025.

We have a lot to celebrate, but there’s still work to do. Too many of our streets are still dangerous, and one Open Streets event doesn’t fix that.

let’s get to work

We hear over and over that it takes a long time to plan, design, engineer, and build new places to bike. That might be true, but that doesn’t mean we should be patient. The climate is already changing. It’s in the plan is just not good enough. Plans don’t keep people safe. Plans don’t reduce carbon emissions. We need to change our streets. Now.

In 2020, with your donation, we’re keeping the pressure on until the paint is down, until the concrete barriers are in the street, until dangerous drivers are off the road, and until our families and neighbors have safe, comfortable places to ride bikes.

Your gift supports what it takes to win region-wide: organized people, deep relationships with elected officials, and a big list of folks who are willing to spend a few minutes writing an email or making a phone call to their elected officials.

Building these relationships is important, because not everyone thinks safe places to bike should be a priority. Across the region, we’re fighting the same fight over and over again—on Little Falls Parkway in Bethesda, on Seminary Road in Alexandria, on 9th Street NW in DC. Every neighborhood has folks with time, money, and influence, willing go to the mat over the most marginal inconveniences to their driving experience. Your donation helps us make sure that their voices aren’t the only ones in the room

Your donation means more people speaking up for biking where it counts—at meetings, hearings, and neighborhood events.

donate

Will you make a donation today to help us reach our goal? Your tax-deductible donation means more bike lanes, safer streets, healthier people, and connected communities, and we are so grateful.

—Greg

20×20 Campaign Update: August 2019

On July 22nd, WABA rolled out its 20×20 Campaign, detailing a realistic but urgent plan for the District to add 20 miles of new protected bike lanes by the end of 2020. 

Since then, we’ve been steadily gaining momentum. A majority of the DC Council signed a letter to the District Department of Transportation expressing support for the plan. (See if your councilmember signed on and send them a note here.)

We held our first Safe Streets 101 Advocate training in Ward 2. Some of the attendees are organizing an Action Group for the Ward. If you’d like to get involved, you can sign up here

Our next Safe Streets 101 Advocate training is tonight at the Anacostia Library in Ward 8. Join WABA’s advocacy staff for an informative and engaging evening training to explore the many ways that you can help make bicycling better in your neighborhood and in the city. No experience is necessary. Sign up here

Progress on the street:

DDOT has heard you loud and clear: We need more protected bike lanes. Not in five years. Now. 

The agency is finishing up three new protected bike lane projects at the moment: 

First Street SW: Earlier this month, the city added buffers and bollards on a block of 1st Street SW near the baseball park, showing that quick changes are possible:

Florida Ave NE:

In a radical (and much needed) departure from its usual timeline for project completion, DDOT is nearly finished installing a mile-long protected bike lane on Florida Avenue NE, from the Red Line tracks to 14th Street NE. As work continues for the complete reconstruction of the corridor, these changes are already making Florida Ave more safe and accessible.

Edgewood Street NE

A connected network is important! This new block of flexposts connects the Metropolitan Branch Trail to Franklin St NE, another section of future protected bike lane included in our 20×20 plan.

Ways to get involved:

But there’s still a lot of work to be done! Whether you have a few minutes or a few hours, here are some ways you can help move this campaign forward: 

Email your councilmembers: 

Seven DC Councilmembers announced their support for WABA’s 20×20 Plan, a bold vision for 20 miles of safe, connected, and equitable protected bike lanes in DC added to our network by the end of 2020. 

This leadership is exactly what we need. Thank your Councilmembers who signed on! Ask the Councilmembers who did not sign on to formally show their support for more safe places to ride.

Take Action

Join a Ward Action Group We get results when conversations about safe streets are happening at every level and in every neighborhood, so we are standing up an action group in every ward. Sign up!

Attend a Safe Streets 101 training: 

Ward 8: Tonight (August 22)

Ward 5: September 24

Ward 7, 6 and 4 coming soon, and Wards 1 and 3 a little further down the road.

What does WABA think about electric scooters?

Note: This blog post was written (and the policy was adopted) before the District announced its pilot program for shareable electric mopeds. When we’re talking about scooters here, we are referring to the lightweight, low speed, personal mobility devices, not mopeds.

The short version:

WABA supports electric shared scooters as a transportation option in the Washington region. 

Scooters provides a low-emission, affordable and on-demand travel option and an alternative to private or shared cars. 

WABA will, of course, continue to advocate on behalf of the bicycling public. The infrastructure needs of people riding scooters are closely aligned with the needs of folks on bikes. Our goal is to improve the conditions and safety for everyone who walks, bikes, and scoots throughout the region, and this policy will help us decide future policy positions and advocacy work. 

As with bicycling, we encourage lawful, neighborly scooter riding.

Read the full policy here.

Advocacy Roundup: Summer 2019 Edition

It’s been a long time since we wrote this round-up and it’s been a very busy 2019. In writing this, I want to give my sincerest thanks to those of you who have taken action, shown up, and fought for safer streets, more trails, and better bicycling. I know that it seems like an uphill climb at times, but the effort put into this year has already shown to be powerful. Between pending legislation, refreshed infrastructure planning (DC, Arlington, and Montgomery County), and organizing momentum—we are on our way to better biking in the region. For everyone.

We can’t wait another year for laws to make our streets safer.

If DC is serious about making streets safer, the DC Council needs to hold a hearing on the four bills presented this spring before July recess. Read more about the four bills presented by DC Councilmembers Cheh, Allen, Grosso and Todd here.

Rendering courtesy of DDOT and NPS.

The Arboretum Bridge and Trail is a once-in-a-lifetime connection

The Arboretum Bridge and Trail will not only connect Wards 5 and 7, but it will bring the Anacostia River Trail one step closer to completion! The bridge will serve a transportation function, connecting residents to jobs, local businesses, and much more. It will also connect the Arboretum to Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, uniting two of DC’s most unique outdoor spaces. You can submit your comments on the project by July 31 here.

Rendering of the rejected road diet for the Capital Crescent Trail crossing of Little Falls Parkway.

Planning Board nixes Little Falls Parkway road diet at Capital Crescent Trail

In a surprising and deeply disappointing decision, the Montgomery County Planning Board voted 4:1 to restore Little Falls Parkway to a four-lane road and detour the Capital Crescent Trail to cross at the traffic signal at Arlington Road. They rejected all three options, including the staff recommended one, which were thoroughly studied over the past 18 months. Removing the road diet contradicts county policy, best practices, staff expertise, and parks data, which showed that the road diet substantially reduced crashes and speeding. Read more about the Board’s decision and our thoughts here.

It’s time for a protected bike lane on Fenton Street

Fenton Street in downtown Silver Spring has almost everything it needs to be the Silver Spring’s main street. It is lined by cafes, shops, entertainment and community spaces kept bustling by the tens of thousands of people who live and work nearby. But step off the curb and it’s chaos—unsafe crossings, aggressive drivers and a car-centric road design. Sign the petition to let Montgomery County leaders know that Fenton needs to change, for the better.

Update: Connecticut Ave NW Protected Bike Lane meeting

At a public meeting on June 25th, the District Department of Transportation (DDOT) announced that protected bike lanes were not in the immediate future for the Connecticut Avenue Streetscape and Deckover Project. This came as a shock, as ANC 1B and 2C passed resolutions in support of the PBLs in this project. Following backlash from residents, 22 hours later, DDOT Director Jeff Marootian announced on Twitter that the protected bike lanes will be reinstated into the Connecticut Avenue NW project plans. Read a full recap of the second public meeting here.

Bike to School Day events at Garfield Elementary win DDOT Trailblazer Award!

On May 8 and May 29, WABA supported Safe Kids DC’s Bike to School Day Events at Garfield Preparatory Academy with Safe Routes to School National Partnership, the Metropolitan Police Department, DDOT, and Safe Kids World Wide. 301 youth riders from grades PreK to 5 rotated through three stations: a helmet fitting station, a bike obstacle safety course, and a bicycle license plate art project. Find pictures from the events and a quick recap here!

DDOT shares plans for Florida Ave NE

On Thursday, June 20, DDOT staff hosted a meeting to share their plans for immediate changes to Florida Ave NE to calm traffic, improve intersection safety, and add protected bike lanes on the corridor. Florida Ave NE has long been a dangerous corridor due to rampant speeding and outdated road design. More than 150 people attended to see the plans, ask questions, and share their stories about their ongoing experience with traffic violence.

DDOT’s plan will remove one or more travel lanes from the Avenue from 2nd St. NE to 14th St. NE, narrow travel lanes, and add dedicated turn lanes at intersections. New protected bike lanes, separated by paint, rubber wheel stops, and a new, more imposing kind of bollard, will run from 3rd St. to 14th NE. Changes are also coming to intersections, with new markings and turn restrictions, and to 6th St. NE, where it will become one way north of K St NE. Review the full plans here. DDOT staff will collect comments over the next month and start work in July. Planning continues for the complete reconstruction of the corridor.

Alexandria prioritizes cars over people on Seminary Road

On Monday, June 24th, the City of Alexandria’s Traffic and Parking Board voted 3 to 2 to prioritize cars over people on Seminary Road. The vote was a surprise given that 46 of 68 speakers spoke about the need for safe accommodations on Seminary Road for pedestrians, bicyclists, and people of all ages and abilities. Despite overwhelming support for slower speeds and more people-focused design, the board voted (with little discussion) to recommend that City Council maintain four lanes for cars on Seminary Road between N. Howard Street and N. Quaker Lane. City Council will make the final decision about Seminary Road after a public hearing on Saturday, September 14th.

Arlington wants to reach 8% of people getting around by bike by 2025

Arlington County confirms vision for inclusive, low-stress biking in master plan

In April, the Arlington County Board adopted a new bicycle element for the Master Transportation Plan to support the growth of biking in the county. After two years of hard work, outreach, stakeholder input, and revision, the new plan sets out a much more ambitious, inclusive and low-stress bicycling vision for Arlington.

Montgomery County adopted a new Bicycle Master Plan

In November 2018, Montgomery County adopted a new Bicycle Master Plan, concluding more than three years of intensive analysis, public engagement, and advocacy. By adopting this plan, the County Council endorsed a dramatic shift in the County’s goals and approach to growing bicycling, committing MoCo to a convenient, inclusive, and low-stress bicycling future!

East Coast Greenways Trails Summit

In April 2019, Advocacy Team members Katie and Jonathan presented at the East Coast Greenways Mid-Atlantic Trails and Greenways Summit in a session titled, “Public Engagement in Ways That Count”. Katie and Jonathan presented their unique approaches to engaging community members in their work. Watch their session presentations here!

2019 Washington Region Vision Zero Summit

The third Vision Zero Summit was March 25 at the Milken Institute of Public Health. This year’s Summit had a new component: a Community Listening Session on Traffic Safety, held the evening prior to the Summit at the Anacostia Playhouse. Find the recap of this year’s Summit here. And browse the hashtag #VZSummitDC on Twitter for a full look at Summit highlights.

Nonprofits Unite to Create Equitable Access for Cycling

In May, REI board of directors  and leadership visited Washington, DC for a tour, where our very own Katie Harris did an amazing job representing WABA and the Capital Trails Coalition! Check out their adventures in this clip from REI.

Trainings, Workshops, and Meetings

Rock Creek Far East 1 Livability Study – Public Workshops

DDOT has hosted two of three public events for the Rock Creek East I Livability Study. WABA staff and supporters have been in attendance to share their perspective on improvements to transportation safety in the area of the study. connections to destinations for all modes. At the first public workshop, DDOT introduced the project, shared data collection, and provided opportunities for participants to share existing concerns. In the second meeting, DDOT introduced the corridors that have been identified as focus areas, but are continuing to gather community input. Interested in attending a Ward 4 Community Meeting? Email jonathan.stafford@waba.org.

Ward 8 Traffic Safety Meetings

WABA holds monthly Ward 8 Traffic Safety Meetings with community members, ANC commissioners, Safe Routes to School National Partnership, Safe Kids DC, DDOT, MPD, Mayor’s Office Representatives, Capitol Bikeshare, private sector companies, and local businesses. The group discusses Ward 8 transportation trouble spots, shares ideas for how to make travelling on foot or bike safer, and advocates for safe walking and biking.

Recently, the group met with DDOT and community members for a High Crash Site Visit on South Capitol Street SW. DDOT data shows South Capitol Street to be one of the most dangerous corridors for pedestrians and bicyclists in Ward 8. The group identified safety issues including high speeds, missing signage, and crossing difficulties (to name a few). Interested in attending a Ward 8 Traffic Safety Meeting? Email hannah.neagle@waba.org.

Are you on your local WABA Action Committee?

All across the region great people are working to fix our streets to make biking safe and popular. They meet each month to share ideas and work together for better places to bike. Whether you’re looking for a fun group, a new cause, or a wonky policy discussion, our Action Committees have it covered.

See what we’re doing in your community and join us for the next meeting.

WABA in the News

The District’s long road to building a half-mile bike lane that leads to the U.S. Capitol – The Washington Post, January 1, 2019

DC Metro to allow bikes on trains during rush hour – Washington Examiner, January 2, 2019

Metro to welcome bicycles on trains at rush hour starting Jan. 7 – WJLA, January 2, 2019

Metro lifts ban against bikes on trains during rush hour – The Washington Post, January 2, 2019

DDOT moves ahead on plans for three new protected bike lanes in Northwest – The DC Line, January 4, 2019

District is ramping up street safety measures for the new year – The Washington Post, January 5, 2019

Riders have started to bring their bikes on Metro during rush hour. So far, so good. – The Washington Post, January 15, 2019

Residents and two museums take different sides at a contentious meeting about a Dupont bike lane – Greater Greater Washington, January 18, 2019

DC wants to make clear to drivers that bike lanes aren’t for parking, idling, or loading – The Washington Post, February 21, 2019

DC Quietly Banned Biking With Headphones This Year – DCist, February 19, 2019

Do bike-share programs worsen travel disparities for the poor? – The Washington Post, March 5, 2019

Five Takeaways From Washington Vision Zero Traffic Safety Summit – WAMU, March 14, 2019

The District’s streets are dangerous, unjust and unsafe, by design – Greater Greater Washington, March 21, 2019

Kid-sized ‘traffic parks’ are D.C.’s new playgrounds with a purpose – WAMU, April 11, 2019

Locals call for enforcement of bicycling rules in DC as city plans to install protected bike lanes – WUSA9, April 17, 2019

Bicycle activist killed on bike in crash with stolen van in the District – The Washington Post, April 19, 2019

Bicyclist fatally struck by vehicle on Florida Avenue – WJLA, April 19, 2019

Driver fatally strikes beloved bike advocate in Northeast, marking first 2019 D.C. cyclist death – Curbed DC, April 19, 2019

Police: Driver of stolen van hit, killed biking advocate in DC – WTOP, April 19, 2019

DC plans to step up enforcement of bike lane regulations – The Washington Post, April 20, 2019

Dave Salovesh, 1965 – 2019 – Washington City Paper, April 20, 2019

Cycle of bike thefts ends with officers on bicycles arresting a suspect – The Washington Post, April 21, 2019

‘It’s Frankly, Personal’: DC’s Cycling Community Ramps Up Activism After Longtime Advocate’s Death – DCist, April 22, 2019

After cyclist is hit by police car turning right on red, police charge cyclist – The Washington Post, April 24, 2019

Cyclist collides with police car, riders debate right on red rule – WUSA9, April 25, 2019

‘Die in’ held to protest death of DC cyclist killed by speeding driver – WUSA9, April 26, 2019

Shifting Gears for Your Commute – Alexandria Living Magazine, April 26, 2019

DC Residents Remember Those Who Died in Traffic Accidents – The Afro-American, May 2, 2019

Why do reporters still unquestioningly quote AAA on speed cameras? – Greater Greater Washington, May 16, 2019

Are D.C.’s parking woes so bad that the situation needs citizen enforcers? – The Washington Post, May 19, 2019

Ghost bike memorial gets hit, destroyed by SUV – WTOP, May 20, 2019

E-Bikes and Scooters Will Be Allowed on Some Montgomery County Trails – WAMU, May 20, 2019

A Bridge Connecting The National Arboretum And Kenilworth Park Is Slated for 2021 – May 22, 2019

Local sector plan gains residents’ input for new options on development – Montgomery County Sentinel, June 6, 2019

A Brief Summary of the State of D.C.’s Scooter Scene, Summer 2019 – Washington City Paper, June 10, 2019

DC councilmember questions the need for bike lanes in his ward – Curbed DC, June 14, 2019

A bridge would connect the Arboretum and Kenilworth Park, but how will it impact the Anacostia River? – Greater Greater Washington, June 19, 2019

Road safety events planned in Ward 8, the D.C. ward with the most 2019 traffic deaths – Curbed DC, June 21, 2019

Thanks for reading!

P.S. Like what we’re doing for better bicycling in the region? Our advocacy work is directly funded by your membership dollars—donate today.

We’re Hiring: Advocacy Director

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) seeks a creative, innovative and effective Advocacy Director to achieve the advocacy goals of the organization outlined in WABA’s 5-Year Strategic Plan. The Advocacy Director will lead a team of four+ staff members and our extensive volunteer grassroots advocacy network. WABA advocacy focuses on expanding the bicycling network and making the streets safer for people.

The Advocacy Director is a high-profile representative of the organization to communities, public officials and the media. As a member of the Senior Management Team, the Advocacy Director works directly with the Board of Directors, the Executive Director, and other key organizational staff to achieve WABA’s goals in line with our commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion. The ideal candidate must believe in empowering and organizing communities, share WABA’s vision for better biking in the region, and enjoy working in a fast-paced environment.

Job Responsibilities

  • Lead, manage and inspire a growing advocacy team, including conducting weekly check-ins, performance reviews, and other managerial and administrative tasks.
  • Set advocacy department’s annual work plan, with input from staff and Board of Directors that is consistent with the organization’s mission and strategic plan.
  • Develop, execute and win transportation infrastructure, policy and legislative campaigns in line with the WABA Strategic Plan.
  • Develop WABA’s networks and relationships with other non-profit organizations, businesses, elected public officials, governmental agencies and community leaders.
  • Monitor and prioritize effective organizational involvement in major projects, public budgets and campaigns that impact bicycling .
  • Serve as the organizational representative to the media on advocacy issues.
  • Contribute to the organization’s fundraising and development efforts to grow advocacy capacity through membership growth, donation solicitation and grant writing.
  • Management of current and future grant funded projects necessary to fulfill grant obligations.

 Qualifications

  • Demonstrated management experience including leading a team, strategic planning, and capacity building.
  • Proven ability to supervise, mentor, motivate and evaluate employees.
  • Experience advocating for change in a complex environment.
  • Knowledge of, and enthusiasm for, Washington regional politics.
  • Experience with 501(c)(3) and 501(c)(4) organizations, PACs and the legal restrictions of each.
  • Must be able to write clearly and persuasively.
  • Highly organized, self-motivated and able to work closely with others.
  • Experience working in diverse communities and on diverse teams of staff and volunteers.
  • Bachelor’s Degree in communication, public policy, urban planning, transportation, political science, or a related field; or equivalent professional experience.
  • Masters or legal degree desired, though not required.

Employment Details

This position is full-time. Expected salary range is $60,000-$65,000. The position is based in the WABA Office in Adams Morgan, Washington, DC. All employees are expected to work some evenings and weekends with comp time in exchange. This position will report to WABA’s Executive Director.

Benefits include health/dental insurance (WABA covers 100% of the premium for full-time staff); flexible work schedule; vacation and sick leave; committed colleagues; fun working environment; optional voluntary accident/disability insurance; WABA’s 403(b) retirement program; indoor bike parking; and surprising amounts of ice cream. 

WABA is committed to providing equal employment opportunity for all persons regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, marital status, arrest record or criminal convictions, political affiliation, sexual orientation or gender identity, disability, sex, or age.

Apply

Send a cover letter and resume as one PDF to jobs@waba.org. Please include “Advocacy Director” in the subject line. No phone calls, please. 

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis; the position will remain posted until filled. Interested candidates are encouraged to apply by or before Wednesday, July 17th, 2019. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

About WABA

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) is working to create a healthy, more livable region by promoting bicycling for fun, fitness, and affordable transportation; advocating for better bicycling conditions and transportation choices for a healthier environment; and educating children, adults, and motorists about safe bicycling.

WABA’s programs, from youth education to grassroots community organizing, engage residents in Prince George’s County, Montgomery County, Alexandria, Arlington County, Fairfax County, and Washington, DC. 6,000 dues-paying members and thousands more generous supporters have helped WABA transform bicycling in the region again and again over its 47 year history.

WABA is building a region where, in 2020, we’ll see three times the number of people riding bikes. And, by 2035, every single person will live within one mile of a dedicated safe place to bike. We envision a region in which biking is joyful, safe, popular, and liberating; supported by the necessary infrastructure, laws, activities, and investments; and where bicycle ridership mirrors the incredible diversity of our communities.

Thoughts on scooters? Share them with us.

Electric scooters joined the transportation landscape in a big way less than two years ago. The two-wheel, battery-powered scooters are available for rent via a mobile app. Companies such as Spin, Lime, Bird, Bolt, Lyft, and Skip are currently offering scooter sharing services in DC and Arlington while looking to expand the dockless service into other local communities.

The growing availability of scooters presents many possible benefits and creates potential concerns. WABA is developing an organizational position on scooters and we would like your input.

Please share your thoughts and feedback about scooters via our short survey. The survey should only take a few minutes to complete and helps us better understand the community’s thoughts about this new mode of transportation. WABA will use the input from the survey and other research to develop a position on scooters that will inform future advocacy, outreach and education efforts.

Take The Survey

It’s important for us to share that our corporate partners do include companies that offer scooter services. Lime, Spin, JUMP, Bird and Lyft are corporate supporters of WABA or sponsor events. This survey was not developed in coordination with any corporate supporter of WABA, scooter company or otherwise. The board and staff will developed the organizational policy regarding electric scooters independently from corporate partners or sponsors.

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We’re Hiring: Adult Education Coordinator

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) seeks an Adult Education Coordinator for WABA’s Adult Education programs, including Adult Learn to Ride classes, City Cycling classes, Community rides, and Everyday Bicycling Seminars. The ideal candidate must share WABA’s vision for better bicycling in the region and will be responsible for our bicycle education and outreach programming dedicated to serving adults in the Washington, DC region. Additionally, the coordinator will work  with WABA’s Development staff to design, fund, and implement new ideas.

WABA’s education and outreach programs are highly regarded and successful, helping adults throughout the DC region to learn to ride bikes, to ride safely and comfortably on city streets, and to use bicycles to commute to and from work. These programs create opportunities to engage with and educate adults no matter how they ride.

Job Responsibilities

The Adult Education Coordinator will plan, coordinate, and implement WABA’s Adult Education program, including Adult Learn to Ride classes, City Cycling classes, Community rides, and Everyday Bicycling Seminars. The Adult Education Spring and Fall seasons typically run from April to June and September to November, respectively. The Coordinator will be responsible for:

  • Delivering high-quality bicycling experiences to adults throughout WABA’s service area.
  • Scheduling 70+ events per year across these programs.
  • Designing and modifying events, topics, ride routes, and curricula, as needed.
  • Recruiting, training, and coordinating with WABA’s corps of 40+ contracted instructors.
  • Marketing and promoting programs and conducting outreach activities.
  • Leading and teaching classes, rides, and seminars, as needed.
  • Collecting student and instructor feedback and incorporating it into programming.
  • Identifying  areas of need for future programming, designing effective concepts to meet those needs, and working with the Development team to source funding to build new programs.
  • Working with regional stakeholders to expand bicycle education, including to areas not already served.
  • Collaborating with the Programs team in resource sharing, skills development, and cross-program integration of ideas.
  • General administration, including blog posts, data entry, organization/inventory, clerical work, etc.
  • Performing a variety of tasks related to the operations of WABA including office tasks, major event support, and clerical work.

Qualifications

The ideal candidate will have:

  • 2 or more years of program management or program development experience.
  • 1 or more year of direct supervisory experience.
  • Education, instruction, or teaching experience.
  • The ability to pass DC Public Schools’ volunteering requirements: tuberculosis test and criminal background check.
  • Excellent public speaking, presentation, and writing skills.
  • A flexible schedule, specifically working weekends and/or evenings during busy periods of the year. Expect to work minimum 4 hours each weekend during the April-June and September-November periods. WABA provides generous compensatory time for time worked on weekends and evenings.
  • The ability to organize time wisely and multi-task in a relaxed, fun environment.
  • A strong commitment to WABA’s mission.

Additional preferred skills include:

  • Current League Cycling Instructor (LCI) certification or equivalent OR the willingness/ability to obtain certification within first 2-3 months of employment.
  • A current driver’s license and a clean driving record.
  • Marketing/promotional experience.
  • The ability to lift 40 lbs.
  • The ability to ride a bike comfortably and confidently in urban/suburban situations.
  • A solid understanding of the principles of bicycling safety and traffic law.
  • A commitment to being a safe and exemplary bicyclist.

About WABA

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) is working to create a healthy, more livable region by promoting bicycling for fun, fitness, and affordable transportation; advocating for better bicycling conditions and transportation choices for a healthier environment; and educating children, adults, and motorists about safe bicycling.

WABA’s programs, from youth education to grassroots community organizing, engage residents in Prince George’s County, Montgomery County, Alexandria, Arlington County, Fairfax County, and Washington, DC. Six thousand dues-paying members and thousands more generous supporters have helped WABA transform bicycling in the region again and again over its 46 year history.

WABA is building a region where, in 2020, we’ll see three times the number of people riding bikes. And, by 2035, every single person will live within one mile of a dedicated safe place to bike. We envision a region in which bicycling is joyful, safe, popular, and liberating; supported by the necessary infrastructure, laws, activities, and investments; and where bicycle ridership mirrors the incredible diversity of our communities.

Employment Details

This position is full-time. Expected salary range is $40,000-$45,000. The position is based in the WABA Office in Adams Morgan, Washington, DC. All employees are expected to work some evenings and weekends with compensatory time in exchange. This position will report to WABA’s Program Director.

Benefits include 100% employer covered health/dental/vision insurance premiums; vacation and sick leave; committed colleagues; fun working environment; optional voluntary accident/disability insurance; WABA’s 403(b) retirement program; indoor bike parking; and surprising amounts of ice cream.

WABA is committed to providing equal employment opportunity for all persons regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, marital status, arrest record or criminal convictions, political affiliation, sexual orientation or gender identity, disability, sex, or age.

Apply

Send a cover letter and resume to jobs@waba.org. Please include “Adult Education Coordinator” in the subject line. No phone calls, please.

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis; the position will remain posted until filled. Interested candidates are encouraged to apply by or before Monday, March 25th. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.